All posts by Dougie Nisbet

High Force Fell Race, Sunday, June 23, 2019

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. King/Queen of the Mountain Race - click flag for more information. BM / 18km / 500m

Dougie Nisbet

I was tempted to run today. Cronkley Fell is an old Strider favourite and a traditional GP fixture. But 14 days after Comrades I knew it’d be unwise. Many times I’ve run a favourite race, felt fine for the first mile, then not so fine for the remaining 90% of the race. Lessons learned.

So Roberta and I wandered up by High Force, flasks and flapjacks packed, bumped into Jan, and settled down beside the Tees. This is a fine course. There were moments when I wished I’d been on the other side of the lens, but a man’s got to know his limitations.

But it illustrates the wonderful fickleness of the GP. The GP is the Elvet Striders all-rounders race. It’s open to all. And if you had been a lady Strider today, and ran, and finished, you’d have scooped 15 GP points.

results

posgenderagenametimecat
111Callum Hanson (Pudsey & Bramley)01:20:29MO
553Graham Watt01:31:51M40
12121Geoff Davis (NFR)01:41:44M60
232311Robin David Parsons01:48:31M40
28263Allan Renwick01:54:28M50
333014Simon Dobson02:00:20M40
3853Susan Davis (NFR)02:01:29W50

GP Note: Geoff and Susan are not eligible for GP points as they ran as NFR. If I’d run today, as DFR, as I’d planned, I would’ve been ineligible too. To be eligible for GP points you must run as a Strider.

Night of the 5K PBs, Wednesday, June 19, 2019

The night of the 5K PBs

results

nametimerace
Sarah Fawcett25:01race one
Gemma Wandless25:23race one
Andrew Munro26:07race one
Heather Raistrick26:32race one
Corrine Whaling (27 minute pacer)26:39race one
Angela Williams26:56race one
Steph Greenwell27:09race one
Hayley Lockerbie27:51race one
Kathryn Ferry Shanks27:59race one
Wendy Littlewood (30 minute pacer)28:00 approxrace one
Lisa Lumsdon28:04race one
Alan Smith28:29race one
Sharon Pattinson32:10race one
Sandie Greener34:17race one
Sri Prudon34:49race one
Sarah Watson36:14race one
Tim Butler20:58race two
Chris Hassell21:22race two
Nik Corton21:42race two
Malcolm Sygrove21:46race two
Peter Hart21:53race two
Daniel Mitchell21:56race two
Ian Butler21:59race two
David Browbank22:03race two
Adrian Jenkins22:35race two
Chris Shearsmith22:44race two
Alex Brown22:49race two
Rachelle Mason23:00race two
Shaun Roberts23.12race two
Mark Herkes23:35race two
Anna Mason23:39race two
Kathryn Sygrove23:48race two
Louise Collins23:51race two
Kevin Morson23:52race two
Lee Stephenson23:54race two
Mark Foster (24 minute pacer)23:54race two
Lucy Whelan23:59race two
Tim Matthews24:15race two
Lee Brannan24:25race two
Jean Bradley24:40race two
Marc Watson24:44race two
Ashley Price-Sabate24:54race two
Abigail Steed25:00race two
Fiona Harrington-Hughes26:03race two
Rachel Coy27:46race two
Stephen Jackson16:04race three
Graham Watt17:27race three
Michael Littlewood17:32race three
Stuart Scott18:13race three
Barrie Kirtley18:37race three
James Garland18:55race three
James Lee19:03race three
Emma Thompson19:16race three
Juan C Ant20:00race three
David Holcroft20:11race three
David Oxlade20:28race three
Matty Carr20:31race three
Anna Basu20:33race three
Robin Parsons20:41race three
Conrad White20:49race three
Andrew Davies21:02race three

Comrades Marathon, Durban to Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, Sunday, June 9, 2019

86.83 km [UP run]

Dougie Nisbet

Here we go again!

I’d not intended running Comrades again. Twice is a nice number. You can run Comrades to the end of your days, but you can only get the back-to-back medal once. As a novice, by successfully finishing your first two Comrades. I got that last year, but at a cost. It had been a bad race. I had suffered badly and had a nagging doubt that I’d got things wrong. I’d hoped and believed that I was capable of sub-11 and a bronze medal, and it turned out I wasn’t. It itched.

So when late last year, I mentioned to Roberta that, given the chance, I’d do Comrades again in a blink, I detected a flicker of an eye-roll. Comrades is hard on the supporter. A 55 mile point to point, with no view of the race except the crowded finish. It’s harder on the supporter than the runner. And only a few months earlier I’d vowed never again. Never. Again. Too Hard. Then BA announced a new direct service to Durban and things gathered momentum and I thought, third time lucky. One more try at bronze.

I was a bit late to training, but I was structured and focussed. I hit my racing weight, and on the 9th of June, I was in my pen early, munching on a potato, and chatting to a novice South African lady who was telling me she’d be disappointed with anything over 10 hours. Nice problem to have. Bronze is sub-11, and although I suspected I might not be fast enough, I thought I’d get pretty close. My pacing and race plan was for sub-11.

For anyone planning Comrades there is a lot of good writing on the race. I’ve followed the official coach Lindsey Parry’s training guides but I’m also a big fan of the blogs of Norrie Williamson and Bruce Fordyce. On the whole I run a disciplined race and to a plan. I suffered hugely last year and had been puzzled. In an excellent blog post from March this year, Bruce Fordyce writes about his 1985 Comrades:

It wasn’t easy and flowing. I was toiling. I remember the sickening realisation: “You are not in control of this race.”

That summed up my 2018 Comrades. Many of us have mantras and mind games that keep us going when the going gets tough. And this has become mine. Whenever I feel something is wrong I say this to myself as a warning. Something’s wrong, and a rethink is needed. In a long race, even a slightly faster than planned initial pace can cause disaster further down the line.

Comrades is not flat. And the up-run is very not flat. Average paces are meaningless and I was following the pacing suggested by Norrie Williamson. Practical suggestions on where to be and landmarks along the course. I was on target pretty much until the half-way point, almost to the second

At the Ethembeni School I looked forward to some high-fiving with the kids. I confess to indulging in mild mischief here. There’s loads of ebullient confident kids, but there’s all the shy ones too, and the naked delight on their face when you single them out and go up to them and thank them for watching is fab. One lad was so excited he grasped my fingers and wouldn’t let go. Still, my ‘Ethembeni split’ was only 40 seconds so I wasn’t there as long as it felt, but moments like that are intensely emotional and help put the race in perspective.

The school is 36.5km to go on the up-run, and my pace had slipped a fraction. I refocussed and concentrated and tried to go faster. However, at Cato Ridge, with 30km to go, it had slipped some more. I wasn’t going to get sub-11. I wasn’t going to get bronze. I had a pang of disappointment but I knew I couldn’t go faster and maintain it to the finish. In the endgame you can see many that overstretch themselves only to find themselves overstretched in the grass at the side of the road. In an ultra your race pace is the pace you can maintain for the duration of the ultra. So there was no dramatic change in my pace, I just carried on running at the pace I know I could maintain. I was surprisingly upbeat. I was still in control of the race.

With about 20km to go and on a rare descent my legs were telling me an indignant and incessant tale of woe, but my running economy felt not too bad and my breathing was ok. My legs hurt, but I was ok with that. It was just a case of concentrating on a spot in front and keeping the rhythm moving. Then I became aware of a presence behind me. A bloody bus.

After my initial fascination with the Comrades buses in 2017 I have revised my view somewhat. They can be great. but then again, they can be a pain. Sometimes their pacing is good, and sometimes it’s not. And with the organisers squeezing more entries in each year, the roads are fuller, but not wider. I felt, rather than saw, the bus come up behind me and begin to envelop me. I was irritated but resigned to my fate. Resistance was futile. Soon my biological and technological distinctiveness was added to their own. I was assimilated into the collective. I became part of the bus.

But this wasn’t an official bus. It was smaller, leaner, tighter, and I wasn’t sure who was driving. Must be that tall lanky bloke. Except he disappeared after a few kms and the bus kept going. Then that bloke going for his back-to-back. Very impressive. But then, where did he go? I liked this bus. It had raised my pace a fraction, and I had struggled initially to hang on, but I was ok now. The passengers were quite experienced too, watching out for the cats-eyes and pot-holes and such that can be your undoing in a compact running group. I was also rethinking some of my pacing strategy. On a long steep hill, I usually walk the lot, as I can’t see the point of doing 20 paces running every now again and burning energy. But this was exactly what this driver was doing, and, and, I was quite liking it. In fact, when we hit the last of the Big Five, Polly Shortts, we did a walk-jog strategy that was, well, pretty hard, but I hung on.

By this time I had identified the driver. His name was Dean, and apparently, according to what was written on his Adventist running vest, Jesus was coming soon. Dean was certainly working a few miracles and I decided to try and stay on his bus to the Finish. In these last few kilometres Dean encouraged and cajoled us with a faultless pacing strategy and I found my atheism was more than a little challenged.

As we ran into the stadium we instinctively spread out in a line around our driver and then we were swallowed up in the crowded finish. I looked around for Dean; I wanted to thank him. I wanted to shake his hand. I didn’t want to admit it to myself, but this had been a big deal. I normally, and contentedly, run alone. But that bus for the last 20km had been an <ahem>, godsend. I couldn’t see Dean in the crush so I looked at the clock to check my time. 11 hours 40 minutes. 20 minutes spare. Gulp. That had been too close for comfort. Nearly half an hour slower than 2017.

But I was happy. I can’t think what I would’ve done differently. I’d done the training, lost the weight, drunk less beer, rested some more, had a revised plan, had arrived fresh, confident and positive and had gone out to get bronze. And I hadn’t got it. I’d hit my pay grade and wasn’t going to get any further. Time to move on.

Bob Graham Round, Saturday, June 1, 2019

Mark Davinson (Derwentside AC)

Sometimes setting yourself a challenge seems like a good idea. In spring 2011 I first took up running to get fitter and faster for my 5-a-side football. Mainly so John Calvert and Gary Messer wouldn’t complain as much about the number of late tackles I caught them with. I soon found the running was more about what I could do and less about everyone else. I had always been almost the last one picked at school sports and walked more than ran cross country, but this felt different. Perhaps I was in the wrong game? A year later I had done a marathon, won a club cross country trophy and competed in a few fell races. I decided I was retiring from football while I could still walk and took up running full time.

Fast forward to early 2019. I’ve got a seven year Harrier League race streak (every one since I stopped playing football), with a few near misses for a place in the fast pack, I’ve done a few short ultra-marathons, ran a road half marathon in under 1hr25 and completed every distance from 800m to 10,000m on the track in 2017. To be honest though everything else I have competed in is just a sideshow or a warmup for what life is all about: a day out on the fells.

As a man with a short attention span and little patience the monotony of road running was never going to be my thing and any enthusiasm I had for tarmac quickly dissipated. As a member of a traditional road running club since 2012 I’ve always felt like an outsider, a man on a mission to convert the heathen roadies to the joys of big hills and wild descents. Fell running is simple, get from A-B as fast as possible without getting lost. On the uphill’s put your body under as much stress as you dare, stay on the edge of being oxygen deficient for as long as possible before walking regaining strength and increasing oxygen flow to start running again. My general rule is stop when the runner behind stops, start running again when the runner in front starts running. On the down hills the strategy I use is to move my feet as quickly as possible and be prepared for a loose rock or trip hazard. I’ve always understood injury is potentially just around the corner, but you just need to put that to the back of your mind and be confident.

Continue reading Bob Graham Round

Parkrunathon 2019, Saturday, June 1, 2019

Parkrunathon 2019 will take place this Saturday, 1st June. in support of the IF U CARE SHARE foundation. Here is the planned schedule if you’d like to drop in:

parkrunathon 2019 schedule

Timings are approximate but there will be plenty of updates on the Facebook page throughout the day.

If you can, please come and join us for as many or as few parkruns as possible, whether it be in a running or supporting capacity. The more the merrier. For those wanting to run, there is no registration required, just simply come along. All parkruns, apart from the official parkrun at Segdefield, will be classed as freedom runs, no official timings.

More details can be found on the fundraising donations page and on Facebook.

Pier to Pier, South Shields to Roker, Sunday, May 19, 2019

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information.

Results

posbibnamesexcattime
1553Liam TaylormMen38.5506
42615Molly Pace (Jesmond Joggers)wWomen44.7693
9240Michael MasonmSeniors M4040.8661
15237Georgie HebdonmMen42.2265
16204Graeme WattmSeniors M4042.2655
18247Michael LittlewoodmSeniors M4042.4475
28963Stuart OrdmMen43.4453
59159Allan RenwickmSeniors M5046.0298
941199Juan Corbacho AntonmMen47.6265
98161David HolcroftmMen47.824
1551130Conrad WhitemSeniors M6050.1882
157318Stephen SoulsbymSeniors M5050.2041
164273Matthew CarrmSeniors M4050.4936
1721319John BissonmSeniors M4050.8191
21456Katy WaltonwWomen52.1454
252250Peter HartmSeniors M4053.2151
263249Ian ButlermSeniors M5053.5762
2761Jonathan HamillmSeniors M4054.0397
300792Dan MitchellmSeniors M4054.6321
312305Corrine WhalingwWomen54.9451
32844Mark FostermSeniors M4055.1566
3461000Mark HerkesmMen55.4608
380668David BrowbankmMen56.1356
406861Laura JenningswWomen56.8738
424241Rachelle MasonwSeniors W4057.3278
426395Angela CharltonwSeniors W4057.37
45732Karen ByngwSeniors W5057.8047
464245Anna MasonwSeniors W4057.8386
4672Lee BrannanmSeniors M4057.8654
4731065Sarah DavieswSeniors W5057.9566
482996Chris ShearsmithmSeniors M4058.054
518232Robin LintonmMen59.109
52524Alan ScottmSeniors M5059.2334
533261Marita Le Vaul-GrimwoodwSeniors W4059.44
556805Craig WalkermSeniors M5060.1963
592283Lee StephensonmSeniors M4061.3598
597233Jill RudkinwSeniors W4061.4806
608619Jean BradleywSeniors W6061.8119
612264Lesley CharmanwSeniors W4061.8753
6281404Joshua WaltonmMen62.1242
666231Kimberley WilsonwWomen63.0654
669267Natalie BellwWomen63.3119
673964Zoe Dewdney ParsonswSeniors W4063.3837
682425Kelly GuywWomen63.6534
737611Sarah FawcettwSeniors W5064.867
745285Damian CookmSeniors M4065.0078
747680Debra ThompsonwSeniors W5065.0343
77723Aileen ScottwSeniors W4065.9567
789251Janet ElliswSeniors W5066.1283
82238Alan SmithmSeniors M7067.3495
8261149Andrew ThurstonmSeniors M6067.5143
859806Catherine WalkerwSeniors W6068.6892
9541299Victoria DowneswWomen72.0434
9891047Jane BailliewSeniors W4073.2992
103933Sophie DenniswWomen75.3224
1085504Carolyn GalulawSeniors W4076.7423
109147Jane DowsettwSeniors W5076.7654
1096438David RushtonmSeniors M4076.9071
109839Lisa LumsdonwSeniors W4076.9934
1127406Julie SwinbankwSeniors W4078.6131
113766Carole Thompson-YoungwSeniors W5079.2282
1145265Laura GibsonwSeniors W4079.5732
1146344Rebecca GilmorewWomen79.5884
1247346Rachel TothwSeniors W4091.6299
1272227Helen LintonwSeniors W50101.5146
1273228Diane SoulsbywSeniors W50101.537
1274246Wendy LittlewoodwSeniors W40101.5388
1275270Sandra GreenerwSeniors W40101.5523

A weekend of Marathons, Wednesday, May 1, 2019

and half marathons, and 10ks, and …

London

pos (Overall)pos (Gender)pos (Category)NamebibCatHalfFinish
1KIPCHOGE Eliud (KEN)118-3902:02:37
1KOSGEI Brigid (KEN)10518-3902:18:20
677663133Littlewood Michael (GBR)193340-4401:21:2702:44:21
691676138Mason Michael (GBR)3046640-4401:20:4002:44:35
3692354251Thompson Emma (GBR)84218-3901:37:2203:12:58
17409124572268Shearsmith Chris (GBR)4985340-4401:59:2804:10:14
1891655001018Search Jenny (GBR)2452940-4402:05:2004:15:52
1937956692959Boal Rachel (GBR)1409018-3902:01:1504:17:41
208036229549Rankin Sarah (GBR)339850-5402:11:0404:23:22
2222268131212Rudkin Jill (GBR)2452840-4402:09:4804:28:18
24165164912929Brannan Lee (GBR)2452740-4402:09:1704:35:45
32938119842061Wood Fiona (GBR)1063740-4402:32:5405:14:26
340341258285Farnsworth Christine (GBR)3366665-6902:26:2905:20:47
37613146002451Littlewood Wendy (GBR)2768040-4402:34:3605:46:51

Blackpool

posNameBibGunChipSex
1STEVE HUGHES (WHEELCHAIR ATHLETE Lancaster Runners)104802:45:30.9202:44:59.25M
2UGIS DATAVS (Weshem Road Runners &AC)58902:48:18.0102:48:15.36M
4GARETH PRITCHARD164802:53:19.3702:53:16.85M
33SALLY WALLIS (Deeside Runners)208003:18:13.1903:18:06.68F
225DOUGIE NISBET148504:11:44.2504:10:54.72M
310CATHERINE SMITH184404:34:30.2804:33:47.60F

Stirling

posnamebibtime
1Michael Wright (Central Athletics Club)3502:29:32
532Anna Seeley12504:07:36

Have you been affected by any of the events mentioned above? What about events that haven’t been mentioned? Let us know.