Category Archives: GP

The GP is made up of 24 races in four general categories: Cross-country, Fell and Trail, Short Road or mixed-terrain, and, Long Road or mixed-terrain.

Each category comprises six races, and there are separate women’s and men’s competitions.

In each race the first Strider home gets 15 points, the second 14 points and so on. All Striders 15th and below get 1 point.

In the overall Grand Prix all 24 races count. In each category a runner’s best four from six count.

Race Key
See the fixtures page for details of individual events.

Coxhoe 10K Trail Run, Sunday, September 23, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information.

Coxhoe 10K Trail Race Group Photo - photo by Catherine Smith

Results
posbibNametimeGender
1207McKenzie James (Heaton Harriers)00:35:04M
342Callan Chris00:35:55M
4181Mason Michael00:36:44M
9122Watt Greame00:39:19M
10110Potts Bryan00:39:51M
1163Scott Stuart00:39:57M
1364Kirtley Barry00:40:22M
1762Anderson Michael00:40:49M
369Holcroft David00:44:38M
37103C. Anton Juan00:44:41M
43164Darby Lisa (Sedgefield Harriers)00:44:55F
46230Ray Phil00:45:23M
4719Barlow Michael00:45:24M
4915Basu Anna00:45:29F
50209Mitchell Dan00:45:34M
5193Jones Fiona00:45:47F
52220White Conrad00:45:59M
614Alfree Robert00:47:06M
62116Lumsdon David00:47:23M
7077Chaytor Trevor00:48:32M
78189Sabate Jordi00:49:59M
8044Carr Matthew00:50:07M
88117Connor Philip00:50:51M
9345Scott Alan00:51:05M
9639Foster Mark00:51:26M
97132Panke Jan00:51:28M
10870Mason Anna00:53:09F
113176Brown Alex00:53:33M
11984Ellis Stephen00:54:54M
12518Barlow Stephanie00:55:50F
131208Talbot Rebecca00:56:36F
13649Dixon Angela00:57:26F
13843Scott Aileen00:57:33F
140168Young Jan00:57:50F
144137Stephenson Lee00:58:06M
152111Glassey Danielle01:00:03F
159136Walker Sue01:01:38F
17047White Staney01:03:16M
175118Waugh Lynne01:03:57F
184195Dennis Sophia01:07:10F
18622Fisher Anne Marie01:07:47F
187105Pattison Sharon01:08:34F
18992Richardson Joanne01:09:28F
196140Lumsdon Lisa01:14:25F

Vale of York Half Marathon Results, Sunday, September 9, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Endurance Champion Race - click flag for more information.

posbibnamecatcat poschip timegun time
1835Kev Jeffress (Sunderland Harriers & AC)M351/1521:11:481:11:49
3824Stephen JacksonM352/1521:12:001:12:00
32235Chris CallanM3511/1521:19:101:19:12
371012Sarah Lowery (Rotherham Harriers & AC)F351/1111:19:521:19:56
60712Georgie HebdonMSEN20/1931:22:431:22:48
16332Michael AndersonMSEN42/1931:30:031:30:09
379857Fiona JonesF4012/1411:40:311:40:57
429223Ian ButlerM5520/711:42:291:42:43
541948Nick LathamM4566/1561:46:551:47:20
587193David BrowbankM3582/1521:48:261:49:05
675957Marita Le Vaul-GrimwoodF4520/1091:51:231:53:10
719601Simon GrahamM3598/1521:53:121:54:34
7471764Vaughn WilliamsM35101/1521:54:451:55:54
81385Stephanie BarlowF4527/1091:57:261:57:53
8791017Stephen LumsdonM45120/1561:57:521:59:46
9671400Jill RudkinF4050/1412:01:152:02:57
11071621Mark TodmanM35134/1522:07:182:09:37
14421566Julie SwinbankF35100/1112:33:492:35:00

Vale of York Half Marathon, Sunday, September 9, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Endurance Champion Race - click flag for more information.

Nick Latham

Vale of York Half Marathon was my first race at this distance back in 2015 and I loved the event, so wanted to pay it another visit. It’s based out of the aero club near Sherburn-in-Elmet (between Leeds and Selby), so it’s a bit of a drive to get to (about 1 hour 30 minutes from Durham), but not outrageous for a half marathon. I’d arranged to give a lift to David Browbank and Georgie Hebdon, partly to be a bit greener and partly to have company on the drive. It was a smooth journey down the A1 as one might expect for early on a Sunday morning, only punctuated by the seemingly never-ending road works in two places. Sherburn in Elmet is only 10 minutes or so off the A1, so really easy to get to.

We knew that the road to the car park was also part of the race route and the access was being closed at 9am, so setting off at 6:40am to get there just after 8am seemed like enough contingency for any travel problems; it was plenty. As we arrived, we chuckled at the apparently over-zealous marshalling in the car park as we headed over to the portaloos and registration (in that order, got to get your priorities straight). We were early enough that both queues were limited and the loos were still in a decent state, so there was an added benefit to being early.

For some reason, the aero club seemed to be a centre for the local wasp population, so once the car park entrance was closed and the announcement went up to head over to the start we trotted over to shake them off and made use of the runway for the rest of our warm-up. Conditions were cloudy and reasonably mild (mid to high teens celsius) but breezy; looking back, we had much better overall conditions than the Great North Run competitors were “enjoying” that morning. The start was scheduled for 9:30am but was delayed for about 10 minutes for people arriving late at the start. After a couple of short announcements, we were off.

Main group
Photos © and courtesy John Ashton

The course was slightly modified for this year but started in a similar way to my previous experience – we went most of the length of the runway and looped back before following the aero club roads out onto the surrounding lanes. I set off at 8 minute mile pace as that was my plan and what I intended to hold for the first half of the race. Once I’d settled into my pace, I switched to keeping tabs on my heart rate, since I know from experience how best to manage my effort through the race.

Nick Latham in the main field (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)One of the big attractions of the course is that it’s almost completely flat. There’s one rise in the form of a bridge over the railway line which we reached just after 3 miles and appears again on the return. I eased off the pace coming up the slope and picked up a little coming down the other side before settling back into my pace.

The camber of the roads is, shall we say, interesting. In places they’re pretty flat, in others they distinctly roll off to one side or another, so at times I had to pick my line carefully to avoid running across the slope. The beauty of the smaller field (limit of 2,000) meant that after the first couple of miles it was possible to pick whatever line I wanted.

Georgie Hebdon (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)After the railway bridge, there was a stretch through Bishop Woods, which was also where the first water station was set up. The road continued along to a crossroads shortly after 5 miles where a left turn started the loop of the lollipop-shaped course. Just after taking the turn I started on my fuelling – jelly babies – which I know I benefit from and have tried in training before. I find them less uncomfortable on my stomach than gels.

I’ve heard people describe the course as dull, but I think the area’s very attractive, with lots of open countryside, occasional housing and some variety to the views. A lot of the people who live in the area come out to watch the race and support the runners, some at junctions & turns, some at the ends of their drives. It’s a welcome boost all round the course.

Michael Anderson (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)Just after the second water station, about halfway round the loop, I started to pick up the pace a little – about 7:50 per mile, sticking to the plan – which lasted until about the end of mile 8, when the wheels started to come off. My legs were numb and I had to ease my pace off to around 8:20 per mile just to keep my heart rate in check; I knew that if I tried to push on at the pace I wanted I would blow up way before the finish, and I had a feeling that breeze was going to play a bigger part towards the end. I gritted my teeth and concentrated on plugging on, keeping my heart rate progression where I wanted it. Over the next 3 miles or so, I managed to keep up at between 8:10 and 8:20 pace, ignoring the last water station in the woods and measuring my effort over the bridge – easing on the climb and accelerating downhill again.

That breeze I mentioned had mostly been at our backs, cross-winds or sheltered in places by the wood or the hedges. As we turned back along Bishopdyke Road, just after 11 miles, it was full in our faces and a fair bit stronger than it had been on the way out. There was still two miles to go, no prospect of shelter from the wind and dead legs. This was purgatory. Even turning a 90 degree left turn towards the aero club at 12 miles didn’t seem to help. Nothing for it but to focus on trying to keep form and cadence, dig deeper and just get to the finish. It was great to get shout outs from faster Striders who’d already finished, like Chris Callan, and other Strider supporters on the run in. From my previous running of the course, I knew where the finish was so I was able to time my final effort. I hadn’t used any of my fast-twitch fibres up to that point, so managed a respectable kick over the last hundred metres or so, but that was my lot. I left everything out on the course and that’s all I could ask of myself.

If I’d managed to pull off what I’d intended in my planning, I would have achieved a PB compared to Sunderland 2017. As it was, I came in 2 minutes slower at 1:46:55 (chip time), but beating my previous time on this course by 3 minutes. I could try to blame the wind, but I reckon it only took about 40 seconds out of me over those last two miles. The truth is that my training wasn’t enough to support my aspiration. The important thing is I’m going to take the experience and see how I can adapt my training to achieve it next time.

David Browbank (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)Georgie was already back (a long time before me!) and David was right behind me – I was still trying to stand upright without feeling like I was going to fall over when he emerged from the goody-bag distribution. Some of the other Striders arrived too, including Simon, Stephen J & Vics and Steph. We had a chat about the race and watched the prize-giving, proudly cheering Stephen collect his prize for 3rd male. By this point, we’d cooled down and agreed it would be a good idea to be ready to escape the car park once they re-opened it. We knew the access was being shared with the race route, so might need to be patient.

Fiona Kinghorn-Jones (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)From where we sat in the exit queue, we couldn’t see what was happening but the shouty marshals who were there when we arrived were curiously absent. Eventually there were signs of movement but mostly behind us rather than ahead as people bolted for a different exit. We eventually decided that was the better option and joined them. Once we were out, it was a smooth run back home.

The following day there was an email from the organisers which explained what had happened and why the start and parking arrangements were different to previous years. In short, they’d been denied access to a piece of land they had previously used and the aero club had stepped in at the last minute, which allowed the race to go ahead. The exit arrangements were always going to be a challenge, but were compounded by someone ignoring the road closure and then getting their car & trailer stuck in the entrance gate. The organisers have promised to learn from this year’s arrangements and improve them for future years, and I’m fully confident that they will.

Stephen Jackson on the podium (Photos © and courtesy John Ashton)Apart from the parking problems, which for us were only a minor niggle, the only downside with hindsight was that none of us thought to organise a Striders group photo before the start. I’ve tracked down some excellent photos from John Ashton, amongst which I humbly submit my own Race Face and Flying Feet nomination for this year.

I’m told the course has a lot in common with the Brass Monkey – mostly flat, one bridge, a loop to turn, a common start & finish. Perhaps with the right adjustments to my training over the next few months, that might be where I could try again to recover those lost minutes. Before I get carried away I’ll see if I can get an entry first!

posbibnamecatcat poschip timegun time
1835Kev Jeffress (Sunderland Harriers & AC)M351/1521:11:481:11:49
3824Stephen JacksonM352/1521:12:001:12:00
32235Chris CallanM3511/1521:19:101:19:12
371012Sarah Lowery (Rotherham Harriers & AC)F351/1111:19:521:19:56
60712Georgie HebdonMSEN20/1931:22:431:22:48
16332Michael AndersonMSEN42/1931:30:031:30:09
379857Fiona JonesF4012/1411:40:311:40:57
429223Ian ButlerM5520/711:42:291:42:43
541948Nick LathamM4566/1561:46:551:47:20
587193David BrowbankM3582/1521:48:261:49:05
675957Marita Le Vaul-GrimwoodF4520/1091:51:231:53:10
719601Simon GrahamM3598/1521:53:121:54:34
7471764Vaughn WilliamsM35101/1521:54:451:55:54
81385Stephanie BarlowF4527/1091:57:261:57:53
8791017Stephen LumsdonM45120/1561:57:521:59:46
9671400Jill RudkinF4050/1412:01:152:02:57
11071621Mark TodmanM35134/1522:07:182:09:37
14421566Julie SwinbankF35100/1112:33:492:35:00

Vale of York Half Marathon, Sunday, September 9, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Endurance Champion Race - click flag for more information.

Ian Butler

Trails and Tribulations – How to be a Very Amateur Athlete

Background

Since joining Striders 3 years ago and getting in to this running lark, I have often questioned my self as to whether I am an athlete or not.

I am often the recipient of letters and emails from various sporting organisations addressed to ‘Dear athlete’, and note on race applications and results lists, that athletes are participating in the same event as my self. But the fact is I just don’t see myself as one of the tribe.

A definition I have found describes an athlete as:

A person who is proficient in sports and other forms of physical exercise

However, my experiences this year whilst preparing for and taking part in races hardly demonstrates proficiency in sport, and in reality is more like a long list of complete cock-ups. Having said that, I think with the Vale of York Half Marathon, I am starting to crack it and may be on my way the being a proper athlete. I will now try and explain:

For me, an athlete must have a six pack, muscles in the right places, a square jaw and absence of numerous chins, look the part with all the right gear, and demonstrate excellence in their chosen sport. This goes back to my youth when sporting athletic hero’s looked the part and delivered. People like Brendan Foster, Linford Christie, Sally Gunnell, Kelly Holmes and Alf Tupper were in their prime, and achieving sporting greatness, and are the role models on which I measure what an athlete should be.

I conversely don’t fit in to that mould.

Firstly, my body has a bit of wear and tear, consisting of a series of sporting and work related injuries, held together primarily by scar tissue and lumpy bits. Getting out of bed in a morning, any form of sudden movement, or just walking the short distance from the bed to the loo, is always accompanied by a soft ‘Oooooh’ or “Argghhhhh’ as I manage the aches and pains and delicately try to get things moving. Once I get going, I’m fine, but the getting going gets harder with age.

Secondly, my list of athletic achievements remains short. Admittedly, I was a joint winner at the Maltby Church School wheelbarrow race (1973). I competed in the Inter-house schools cross country (1981), finishing around the back of the field limping in and ending up in hospital having 3 stitches after falling over in the mud at Roche Abbey. I completed the Raby 10k and was awarded a prize, but could not collect it as it was for 3rd finisher in the W60 section having taken a hand me down entry off a friend. I was 32 at the time.

Quite simply, I could not see myself as either athletic or an athlete.

However, things changed a little at the beginning of the year when I retired from work. With more time to focus on training I vowed to improve my running and compete more effectively in races, working to more of my strengths to help improve my fitness.

With very dodgy knees, which are painful in a morning and after longer distance runs, I simply could not risk increasing running mileage. Therefore in addition to the usual weekly runs, I focused on working very hard in spinning classes, 2 sometimes 3 times a week, and cycling in general. This helped me enormously, both aerobically and strength wise, and helped feed my competitive urge when I started to see some improvements.

A failure on my part was not to have a training plan as such. In my mind, if I worked harder, then there should be some improvement. However, as a training aid I have bought a Garmin Run / cycle / swim watch, which I have to admit is brilliant. Apart from trying to run a route, which writes my name on the Garmin Mapping Package, the advantages of the Garmin are many fold. I now know what different running paces feel like rather than second guessing, I can see performance improvement in the stats, I can see what times mates have run and rub it in that they should be faster than me by virtue of age.

In December last year, with little specific training I completed a half marathon for the first time in around 25 years in Sunderland. It killed me, and post race I could hardly walk around, with stiff legs, hips and other bits. However, I had set a marker PB, which I vowed to beat when I next competed in a similar race at some point in 2018, and the VOY Half Marathon was my target.

In the meantime, I had to do more races leading up to VOY to iron out how to do it properly, with out messing up. With that in mind, I have learnt some interesting lessons through competition:

1) Pre Race Food

Running magazines, wise wisdom and other top tips seem to advise that Carb loading is a good idea the night before a race, with a nice pasta dish being a meal of choice.

That’s all well and good, but I have a great recipe for a Chilli and baked bean sausage casserole, which I made the night before the Trail Outlaws Penshaw Monument half Marathon. As hills were expected in this race, I washed the meal down with a bottle of Wainwrights Beer.

The problems started at about 3am with some stomach gurgling.

Having taken appropriate measures I was ok until the moment 20 minutes before the race when I had a distinct need to complete a 100m dash to the toilets. I was pre prepared having taken a role of Andrex™ Best from home, but the main issues was not my ablutions, but the fact I fell off the toilet as the screws holding it to the floor came away and tipped me off. Unbeknown to me, the plumbing from the cistern was now detached, from the toilet, so when I flushed the loo, 10 gallons of water flooded the men’s toilet block. I managed to do some plumbing repairs,, but the cubicle was a mess. I’m sorry if this affected anyone at the time, but I did report it, and it wasn’t my fault, but it was a lesson learned, make sure you eat the right food before a race.

2) Pre Race Ablutions (and Post race ablutions)

The motto is be prepared, and go regularly so that the system is clear.

I thought it was clear on the Gateshead trail 10K at Blaydon, but about a quarter of the way around I had that stomach gurgling again. Whether this was pre race nerves affecting my system or what I’m not sure. The effect was that as the race went on I was running with very tense muscles, and was very close to making a dash to some tree cover to seek relief. Counting down the last kilometres was desperate. However, I eventually managed to get over the line, grabbed my medal and continued at 4-minute mile pace to the toilet cubicles.

That was another lesson learned on my way to being an athlete.

3) Water

This is a real problem for me. Not the fact that I need to take water on board, but how to take water on board at water stations. Race organisers seem to think up different innovative ways to soak me rather than feed water in.

For instance:

  • a) Paper cup – Water split all over the place and trying to drink whilst on the move always ends up with water splashing dribbling down the side of my face
  • b) Water Bottles – Always seem too big, can’t find the opening and I have to tilt my head back, missing my mouth and again dribbling water all over the place
  • c) Water pouches – As used at the Durham 10k. This was a real hard one to master, as I simply could not get the water out whilst running, so gave the damn thing a really good squeeze, resulting in a jet of water in the face and up my nose, missing my mouth completely.

My agreed approach now is that I simply don’t care, and as long as I take water on board, I’m happy.

4) Jelly Babies and other race nutrients

Race organisers like to give out nutritional treats at feeding stations, particularly Jelly babies, which in the right circumstances are great.

Personally, I bite the heads off and chew them, but the dilemma is how many do you take from the box,? And can you select the red berry ones, and ditch the green ones without losing time?

At a Trail Outlaws race I just grabbed a handful as I passed the feeding station, but had too many to eat at once with out feeling sick. Rather than chucking to them away, I decided to keep a few back, only for them to create a horrible sweaty and sticky goo in my hand.

Is it race etiquette to grab a handful, or just take a few selected ones to nibble at?

I have not worked this one out yet, so it’s work in progress..

5) Race Strategy

I’m always being given helpful advice on race strategy. Whether that relates to the pace for the race, (start out slower and finish faster; start out faster and finish slower; just hang in there for grim death), or make sure you get near the front at the start.

The reality is that I fail on race strategy on the day, other than by adopting an approach that I must beat Runner X to the finish line. Runner X being a friend from the dark side, otherwise known as Durham City Harriers.

So far it’s 2 all on the races we have caught up with each other, with me taking the 10k races, and him the half marathons. I tend to start fast and gain a lead, then he gets me as a die close to the finish line

I need some coaching on race strategy.

6) Photographs

This is a completely new concept to participation in sport, both in training and at events.

It never ceases to amaze me that so many photo opportunities exist. The only problem I have, is that I have a great face for radio.

From photos I’ve seen, I seem to manage to pull a tremendous gurning race face, look like a burglars bull dog chewing a wasp, or generally look half dead, even when I’m stationary and not even started the run.

Once I’m up and running, strategically placed photographers always manage to capture me looking as if I’m in the mid throws of collapse, or dealing with trapped wind.

A recent article in Runners World stressed the virtues and benefits of running with a smile, and the evidence of this is everywhere in photos of others, happily running with a happy carefree smile and striking new PBs.

I’m just going to have to smile more when running in order to achieve my goals.

The Race

With these observations in mind, I made my way to Sherburn In Elmet for the VOY, with a view of trying to get a new PB for the distance.

On arrival, the first thing to notice at the race start, was the total absence of Crocodiles, Father Christmases, Dinosaurs, Hen & Stag parties and runners carry fridges on their backs.

What was obvious was the number of club runners sporting their club vests. A smattering of north eastern clubs were represented, but I guess the GNR drew in many from our region. However, the race was dominated by clubs from Yorkshire, such as Steel City Striders, Grimthorpe Harriers, and Royston Vasey ACC. With the promise of a flat fast paced course, the race had clearly attracted many runners intent on going for a good time or PB.

Mayor in foreground with runners behind (Photo © and courtesy John Ashton)
Photo © and courtesy John Ashton

Getting to the start was simple. The only local celebrity available to start the race was the Mayor of Selby, who thanked everyone for coming and set off the race with his air horn.

I’m pleased to say the execution of my plans went well:-

1) Pre race food

Pasta, and no negative after effects.

2) Pre Race Ablutions

Got to the start in good time, and completed without issue.

3) Water

No problems, I just saved the hassle by pouring it over my head.

4) Jelly Babies

Avoided

5) Race Strategy

Got near the front at the start.

I went out far too fast, died at 8 miles as I turned in to the wind, but managed to keep things going and got over the line in a new PB.

Runner X got to the finish line 11 seconds ahead of me after a last ditch overtake, and that’s not got to happen next time.

Having said that I had the moral victory as he is 10 years younger than me, but I wasn’t able to articulate that well to him after the race, plus he wasn’t listening.

6) Photographs

Smiled all the way around, with evidence from the event photo gallery.

Conclusion

Its fair to say that I have learnt my lessons, shown improvement and despite several previous mishaps, have become a little more proficient in this chosen sport. If that makes me an athlete, then I am a happy runner, and role on the XC season.

posbibnamecatcat poschip timegun time
1835Kev Jeffress (Sunderland Harriers & AC)M351/1521:11:481:11:49
3824Stephen JacksonM352/1521:12:001:12:00
32235Chris CallanM3511/1521:19:101:19:12
371012Sarah Lowery (Rotherham Harriers & AC)F351/1111:19:521:19:56
60712Georgie HebdonMSEN20/1931:22:431:22:48
16332Michael AndersonMSEN42/1931:30:031:30:09
379857Fiona JonesF4012/1411:40:311:40:57
429223Ian ButlerM5520/711:42:291:42:43
541948Nick LathamM4566/1561:46:551:47:20
587193David BrowbankM3582/1521:48:261:49:05
675957Marita Le Vaul-GrimwoodF4520/1091:51:231:53:10
719601Simon GrahamM3598/1521:53:121:54:34
7471764Vaughn WilliamsM35101/1521:54:451:55:54
81385Stephanie BarlowF4527/1091:57:261:57:53
8791017Stephen LumsdonM45120/1561:57:521:59:46
9671400Jill RudkinF4050/1412:01:152:02:57
11071621Mark TodmanM35134/1522:07:182:09:37
14421566Julie SwinbankF35100/1112:33:492:35:00

Sedbergh Hills fell race, Sunday, August 19, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. King/Queen of the Mountain Race - click flag for more information. AL / 22.5km / 1830m

Nina Mason

Runners emerging from the cloudA small group of Striders (Paul, Geoff, Mike and myself, with Mum (Jan) supporting) headed over to Sedbergh for this GP race. The forecast was for rain/drizzle, with very poor visibility. I hadn’t run this before, so I’d recced the route a couple of times in similar conditions, and had my checkpoint split times and bearings prepared so I didn’t have to think too hard mid-race.

After the usual pre-race warning about kit, compass and a cut-off time at check 3, we were off. The race has a gruelling start climbing up to Arant Haw (check 1), and to spice things up the cloud base was very low – at times reducing visibility to a few yards (except for the finish, I think we only emerged from it once).

After check 1, a lot more climbing, descending….repeat. The last few miles is a glorious descent from the Calf (via the ‘bump’ that is Winder) which in good visibility is fabulous running. In the race, I was just focussed on staying on the grassy path in this section, aware of wraith-like runners around me in the mist.

I felt like I executed my race plan well – I used my bearings, checked my map, stuck to the route (from what I could tell) and finished just within planned time. It was great to see Mum at checks 1 and 5, peering through the mist looking out for us all – and joking aside, the mist was so dense we really could hear her before we saw her, chatting to the hardy souls at the checkpoints.

Hello Paul!Paul had a great run – as well as his fitness, I think his experience of the course showed. Despite the three of them sprinting away from me at the start, Mike then caught and passed me at check 2, and Geoff caught and passed me twice (yes, twice) at check 2 and check 5. It seems they both ‘strayed’ from the optimum race route and I suspect ran more miles than the race advertises! Perhaps at 57p/mile they didn’t think they were getting VFM. Different conditions on the day and this would be an entirely different race. As well as a number of DNF, there were a few tumbles – with poor Mike cracking his ribs (and then having to drive us home too….thank you, get well soon!)

This is without doubt one of the toughest races I have done up to now – brutal climbs, steep (some un-runnable) descents, sections with no ‘escape route’, ankle-straining gradient on what look like flatter sections, and pathless wilderness between checks 3 and 4. Not to mention the weather conditions. For me, this was much harder than Swaledale or the Yomp – I’m not used to so much climbing, and I know I need to get stronger on the hills.

The pluses – all of the above 🙂! And a well organised race, the beauty of the Howgills (weather permitting), and plenty of friendly, like-minded folks to enjoy it with. Oh, and hot showers at the end at the People’s Hall – what more do you need?

Despite it being tough (or because it was?)….I loved it. Even when my legs were screaming at me to stop. Fabulous race and strongly recommended.

If you are thinking about giving this one a go, I suggest do your homework, test yourself (legs and navigation), recce, recce, recce, and be prepared for anything the weather can throw at you.

Nina and Mike at the finishGeoff, Nina, Mike and Paul.

posbibfirstnamesurnamecattime
2774PaulEvansMOpen03:02:00
6576MikeBarlowMV4003:48:34
6684GeoffDavisMV6003:51:42
7675NinaMasonFV4003:54:40

LGBT Running Festival 5K, Friday, July 20, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information.

posbibnamecatcat posage catage cat poschip timefinish timebehind leader
6699Gareth PritchardM630-39400:17:2400:17:28+00:01:34
10643Michael John LittlewoodM1040-49100:18:0900:18:13+00:02:19
12158Phil RayM1230-39800:18:1800:18:23+00:02:28
31142Mike BarlowM2940-49700:19:5100:19:56+00:04:01
94164Katy WaltonM8330-393800:22:2800:22:36+00:06:38
129154Peter HartM11040-493700:23:3100:23:40+00:07:41
132160Matt CarrM11240-493800:23:2900:23:42+00:07:39
145159Anna SeeleyF2530-391700:24:0000:24:09+00:08:10
198141Stephanie BarlowF5040-491600:25:3000:25:39+00:09:40
259145Jean BradleyF8160-69100:27:1700:27:27+00:11:27
289735Catherine SmiF10240-494000:27:2600:28:12+00:11:36
324165Lynne WaughF12740-495200:28:4400:29:19+00:12:54
327147Emma CumpsonF12940-495400:28:5600:29:31+00:13:06
385150Jane DowsettF16850-591800:30:4400:31:14+00:14:54
433157Mike ParkerM23140-497100:32:0800:32:38+00:16:18
434644Wendy LittlewoodF20340-498800:32:0800:32:38+00:16:18
445146Anita ClementsonF21240-499300:31:4700:33:04+00:15:57
475143Kerry BarnettF23640-4910200:32:5800:34:14+00:17:08
484144Katharine BartlettF24350-593300:33:2100:34:37+00:17:31
556152Claire GallowayF30130-399400:36:1000:36:59+00:20:20
580155Derek Michael IslesM25850-594700:36:5400:38:09+00:21:04
585149Sophie DennisF32530-3910300:37:3800:38:28+00:21:48
623163Bev WalkerF35150-595500:38:5900:40:15+00:23:09
624161Diane SoulsbyF35250-595600:38:5900:40:15+00:23:09
654151Mike ElliottM27570-79200:42:4200:43:32+00:26:52

Durham City Run 10k, Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information. 10k

Stephen Jackson – Winner of Durham City Run 10k 2018 [Photo Credit: Camilla Lauren-Määttä]
posbibtimenamegendergender posclassclass poschip timechip pos
1320533:36Stephen JACKSONMale110K-MS133:361
16287038:12Michael LITTLEWOODMale1610K-M40438:1216
22250538:50Georgie HEBDONMale2110K-MS1238:4722
37300739:36Sam RENWICKMale3610K-MS1939:3336
42261439:53Stuart SCOTTMale4110K-MS2439:4641
48263840:16Barrie KIRTLEYMale4710K-MS2940:1348
56238640:38Matt ARCHERMale5510K-MS3340:3556
71370441:16Stuart ORDMale7010K-MS4241:1070
78201341:37Allan RENWICKMale7510K-M45941:3178
90259042:11Emma THOMPSONFemale410K-FS342:0388
105216843:12Alex WITTYMale9910K-MS6043:08112
123362443:42Nik CORTONMale11710K-M501043:36125
127339743:58David HOLCROFTMale12110K-MS7043:50134
151352644:46Terry ROBERTSONMale14410K-MS8144:31149
171325645:41Stephen WINSHIPMale16410K-M501645:22177
176370845:45Mark PAYNEMale16910K-MS9445:28180
198219246:35Davey LUMSDONMale18910K-M502046:25218
205282646:41Peter BURROWSMale19610K-M502146:35224
228309747:16Simon DOBSONMale21410K-M452746:35222
238333447:28Katy WALTONFemale1510K-FS1047:19267
241289747:28Fiona JONESFemale1710K-F40447:20268
249304747:34Richard HOCKINMale23110K-M65147:23270
258203447:42Jonathan HAMILLMale23910K-M404647:36284
271381447:58Helen TONESFemale2110K-F40647:27274
273398247:59Sarah DAVIESFemale2210K-F50147:51297
291312648:31Robert ALLFREEMale26410K-M404847:41289
292308948:32Ian BUTLERMale26510K-M551047:06255
304215448:50Andrew DAVIESMale27610K-M404948:32317
327368149:26Chris SHEARSMITHMale29210K-M405549:12366
341201449:37Natalie BELLFemale4210K-FS2648:41327
347220149:47Doug JARDINEMale30510K-M405648:38322
358239350:01Philip CONNORMale31410K-MS16349:33387
361343350:04Mandy DAWSONFemale4510K-F50249:20373
367205850:08Peter HARTMale32110K-M405849:07360
369254050:09Susan SCOTTFemale4710K-F401249:41399
381380450:23David BROWBANKMale33410K-MS17048:50337
423255051:17Trevor CHAYTORMale36710K-M551650:48458
454273651:42Nina MASONFemale6010K-F401551:12476
469378351:58Jon TURNERMale40210K-MS20050:32442
473301052:10Fiona SHENTONFemale6910K-F55351:09475
483255152:24Robin LINTONMale41210K-MS20651:49512
493273852:32Jean BRADLEYFemale7410K-F60252:25556
529256553:09Kim BENNETTFemale8710K-F451252:25555
545350953:30Matthew CARRMale45210K-M408352:39572
560205553:54Mark FOSTERMale46110K-M408651:51514
563222753:54Chris EDWARDSMale46310K-MS22952:20547
573218154:06Sally THOMPSONFemale10510K-FS6352:13539
584298254:19Alex BROWNMale47410K-M457352:47580
595226654:34Craig WALKERMale48210K-M552053:08607
597340554:35Vaughn WILLIAMSMale48410K-MS23953:17616
599353254:36Karen BYNGFemale11410K-F451552:07529
626343455:00Jack FRADGLEYMale50710K-MS25253:35642
672404555:38Matthew ROYLEMale53810K-MS26254:06671
676369355:42Tom CROOKESMale54010K-MS26355:16751
679209155:43Sarah FAWCETTFemale13810K-F55554:30692
685223555:46Colin DEANMale54510K-M552653:03601
735263656:40Letitia CHAPMAN-WARDFemale159 10K-FS91 55:57804
747366256:50Lisa SAMPLEFemale16210K-FS9355:48793
748311356:51Neil GARTHWAITEMale58610K-M459154:35699
751296156:55John THOMPSONMale58810K-M459255:41780
758204456:58Lee STEPHENSONMale59310K-M459355:25765
771395457:06Sue GARDHAMFemale16910K-F402955:29769
772272957:06Clare WOODFemale17010K-F403055:29770
829313257:56Adam BENTMale63510K-M60955:49796
851309958:11Angela DIXONFemale20310K-F403856:28846
852255858:12Kimberley WILSONFemale20410K-FS11257:37927
854240758:14Helen PARKERFemale20510K-F403955:00727
867214558:28Richard JACKSONMale65910K-M65757:58958
881223858:44Jenny SEARCHFemale21510K-F404056:21838
885336158:45Matthew DAVIDMale66910K-M507356:52883
929364159:19Lindsay RODGERSMale68810K-M507858:11974
941407459:30Marita GRIMWOODFemale24610K-F454356:12826
947293759:36Lesley HAMILLFemale25110K-F454457:00889
97737401:00:07Wendy LITTLEWOODFemale26610K-F404959:481080
99220751:00:25Stephen LUMSDONMale72110K-M4511257:45941
100420561:00:35Rebecca BLACKWOODFemale27710K-FS15258:12976
102337621:00:46Jane DOWSETTFemale28510K-F501658:17985
104230791:01:02Heather RAISTRICKFemale29510K-F55958:381011
104537231:01:05Nicola DORRICOTTFemale29810K-F501959:281062
106237561:01:25Tim MATTHEWSMale75610K-M554459:171051
107026811:01:36Kelly GUYFemale31010K-FS1651:00:481121
111322451:02:25Philip TODDMale78210K-M4511958:571028
111835041:02:32Becks LIPPEFemale33510K-F45571:00:221102
113422001:02:48Catherine WALKERFemale34610K-F6041:01:161155
114140391:02:56Steph GREENWELLFemale34810K-FS1821:00:321106
120630451:04:23Andrew MUNROMale81510K-M451231:01:411178
120824201:04:26Lynne WAUGHFemale39210K-F40711:02:461240
121521731:04:36Andrew THURSTONMale82010K-M60211:02:291228
121924211:04:40Kirsty NELSONFemale39810K-F45661:02:001193
127738911:05:55Zoe DEWDNEYPARSONSFemale43510K-FS2241:02:55 1252
133021841:06:55Susan WALKERFemale46710K-F6061:04:131311
133535651:07:10Maria DIMOVA-COOKSONFemale47010K-F50441:04:231315
137824771:08:27David RUSHTONMale88310K-M451351:05:141350
143225171:10:02Emma CUMPSONFemale53310K-F40931:06:491403
143822541:10:17Mike PARKERMale90010K-M401471:07:451433
145126911:10:51Angela PHILIPSFemale54510K-F50541:08:101452
145820091:10:59Carol HOLGATEFemale55110K-F45971:08:171460
146721251:11:12Kathleen BELLAMYFemale55810K-F40981:09:061494
151421431:12:30Sharon PATTISONFemale59210K-F401021:09:491519
151522981:12:30Sandra GREENERFemale59310K-F451071:09:481518
160126151:15:14Alan SMITHMale94110K-M7041:12:301600
161034431:15:47James POTTERMale94510K-MS4331:12:211595
165022211:16:44Angela COWELLFemale69410K-FS3341:13:101624
169534801:18:49Sophie DENNISFemale73010K-FS3571:17:221717
173634471:21:16Claire GALLOWAYFemale75910K-FS3701:17:401722
175027611:22:22Bev WALKERFemale77110K-F55291:19:461753
176334261:23:25Louise BARROWFemale78110K-FS3861:20:001756

Pier to Pier Results 2018, South Shields to Sunderland, Sunday, May 20, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information. Approx 7 miles

Anita Wright

Photo courtesy of Michael Wright
RankBibNameGenCatTime
1771Abraham Tewelde
Saltwell Harriers
mMen00.38.57
39759Judith Nutt
Elswick Harriers
wSeniors W4000.45.25
884Michael MasonmSeniors M4000.42.06
1335Michael LittlewoodmSeniors M4000.43.12
14133Mark WarnermMen00.43.12
221221Georgie HebdonmMen00.43.58
315Stuart ScottmMen00.44.45
55458Sam RenwickmMen00.46.47
76720Matt ArchermMen00.48.06
109197Allan RenwickmSeniors M4000.49.28
125804David HolcroftmMen00.50.11
127223Alex WittymMen00.50.14
169783Fiona JoneswSeniors W4000.51.37
19640Davey LumsdonmSeniors M5000.52.29
20395Stephen WinshipmSeniors M5000.52.39
21024Stephen SoulsbymSeniors M5000.52.45
220888Ian ButlermSeniors M5000.53.09
2511Andrew DaviesmSeniors M4000.5406.
2593Jonathan HamillmSeniors M4000.54.21
263148Mark PaynemMen00.54.24
28294Anna BasuwSeniors W4000.55.00
3207Sarah DavieswSeniors W5000.56.04
355740Chris ShearsmithmSeniors M4000.57.06
35610Susan ScottwSeniors W4000.57.10
35721Rachelle MasonwSeniors W4000.57.18
362235Stephanie BarlowwSeniors W4000.57.32
393970Malcolm SygrovemSeniors M5000.58.22
40586Alex BrownmSeniors M4000.58.43
42568Craig WalkermSeniors M5000.59.12
464317Jean BradleywSeniors W6000.59.58
486936Natalie BellwWomen01.00.28
49523Robin LintonmMen01.00.43
534944Lisa SamplewWomen01.01.26
5552Lesley HamillwSeniors W4001.01.56
560236Danielle Harper-BradywWomen01.02.04
606665Jill RudkinwSeniors W4001.03.25
614574Laura JenningswWomen01.03.41
6301002Joanne PattersonwWomen01.04.15
653114Lee StephensonmSeniors M4001.04.50
694159Chloe BlackwSeniors W4001.06.25
695161Jane RannswWomen01.06.26
742191Heather RaistrickwSeniors W5001.07.39
749132Alan SmithmSeniors M7001.07.54
76429Jenny SearchwSeniors W4001.08.07
78854Kate ThompsonwWomen01.08.34
789206Kelly GuywWomen01.08.34
80438Kimberley WilsonwWomen01.08.55
81372Catherine WalkerwSeniors W6001.09.07
816179James NicholsonmSeniors M7001.09.11
823369Jane SkeltonwWomen01.09.33
829573Alison HeslopwSeniors W4001.09.41
846583Kirsten FenwickwWomen01.10.12
853955Letitia Chapman-WardwWomen01.10.29
854166Angela RobsonwSeniors W4001.10.29
8748Danielle GlasseywWomen01.11.28
91573George Alan ScottmSeniors M5001.12.50
92025Elaine BroatchwSeniors W5001.12.55
9216Jane DowsettwSeniors W4001.12.56
92251Carole Thompson-YoungwSeniors W5001.12.56
926767Emma StevensonwWomen01.13.00
929766Tina TaylorwSeniors W4001.13.00
934661Faye WardwSeniors W4001.13.15
94837Wendy LittlewoodwSeniors W4001.13.52
95157Zoe Dewdney ParsonswWomen01.13.56
10031180Alison SmithwSeniors W4001.16.39
1004109Sue WalkerwSeniors W6001.16.39
10131013Christine FarnsworthwSeniors W6001.16.50
10261290Ann KainwSeniors W5001.17.11
1067112James PottermMen01.18.58
1084102Victoria DowneswWomen01.19.49
1085425Jane BailliewSeniors W4001.19.50
109165Aileen ScottwSeniors W4001.20.10
109822Kerry BarnettwSeniors W4001.20.46
1104100Louise BarrowwWomen01.20.58
111156Lindsay ParkerwSeniors W4001.21.30
1128440Sophie DenniswWomen01.22.20
113159Julie SwinbankwWomen01.22.24
1140824Sharon CampbellwSeniors W4001.23.00
1148653Rebecca GilmorewWomen01.23.17
1149455Diane SoulsbywSeniors W5001.23.17
1181181Carol HolgatewSeniors W4001.25.58
12191346Jennifer RollwWomen01.33.51

Hartlepool Marina 5 Road Race, Sunday, April 15, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Sprint Champion Race - click flag for more information. 5 miles

Nick Latham

Photo courtesy of Karen Harland

Five miles isn’t a particularly common race distance in the north-east as far as I can tell, there only seems to be a handful scattered through the race calendar in amongst the more common 5ks, 10ks and half marathons. Perhaps it was this uncommon distance, perhaps being in the middle of the spring marathon season (Paris, Manchester, London etc), or perhaps everyone had rusted up in the biblically damp lead-up to the race. Whatever the reason, it was a relatively small but hard-core Striders contingent of eleven that went out to play.

I scrounged a lift from Jonathan Hamill and his enthusiastic support team in a bid to cut down on carbon emissions. It was an easy journey and not just because I wasn’t driving. We arrived nice and early (just after 9 am), which meant no parking problems. After visiting the boat (not THE boat, sadly – that might have been a little more impressive!) to collect race number (with timing chip) and race t-shirt (sizing’s generous, so I went down a size), we made full use of the nearby McDonalds. Food for the support team, toilets for the athletes. We weren’t the only ones doing it! Other facilities are available.

The weather was starting to warm up from the extended winter we had been “enjoying”. Despite being fine and the sun attempting to break through there was still a chill in the southerly breeze. In the end, I opted to leave a light base layer under my club vest, big wuss that I am.

We warmed-up along Maritime Avenue, where the race would start and finish. By the time we got back to the start the rest of the racers had formed up in the start funnel, so we joined near the back. I was realistic about my likely finish position i.e. nowhere near the front, and the race was chip-timed, so I didn’t see the harm in starting near the back.

The course is essentially flat. It sets out next to the marina following Maritime Avenue through a housing estate before turning up a short incline through a car park and onto the promenade. It is an out and back course so once you’ve reached the turn you know what to expect on the way back. You also get to see the leaders on their return (or the chasers if you’re in the lead). As we met them coming back I counted the places and made Stephen Jackson 9th as we passed and it wasn’t long before I saw Chris Callan and some of our other faster runners on their return, giving me a chance to cheer them on.

I’ve been working my way back from some recent illnesses so I had set an easy expectation on myself – no PB to beat, no pressure. My plan was to set out at 8-minute mile pace, which I thought I could hold all the way through. I would see how I was feeling at 2 miles and then the turn (2.5 miles) and pick up the pace a little if I was feeling OK.

And I kind of stuck to that plan. Kind of. I held 8-minute mile pace for nearly 2 miles but seeing the leaders gave me a burst of adrenaline and my pace picked up before I realised what was happening. It felt OK and sustainable, so I kept at it, keeping around 7:40 pace most of the way back along the promenade. I was picking off other runners all the way back and this was the other advantage of starting from the back and running negative splits, it gave me natural targets to aim for. The route was plenty wide enough to allow easy passing all the way.

Getting to the last 600m or so I dropped back through the car park onto Maritime Avenue and the slight downward slope gave me the impetus to start pushing for the finish.

I’ve always had a finishing kick (a legacy of being a failed sprinter) so really wound it up in the final stretch, earning me a shout out from the tannoy announcer.

Photo courtesy of Karen Harland Photo courtesy of Karen Harland

Stephen was first male Strider home (8th overall in 26:23) and Fiona Jones was first female (20th woman in 35:26 gun time). There were some other excellent times from Striders, including both Chris Callan and Michael Littlewood coming in under 30 minutes (sub 6-minute mile average). In total there were 493 runners with times ranging from a blistering 24:16 (new CR from Dominic Shaw of New Marske Harriers) to just over 1:07.

I loved this race. It was a great course, inexpensive and accessible. It’s a good opportunity to run this less common distance and a real PB opportunity.

Harrier League, Alnwick, Saturday, March 17, 2018

Grand Prix Race - click flag for current league tables. Mud King/Mud Queen Race - click flag for more information.

Results

men
posbibnamecatpackrace timeactual time
119Dan Leng (Alnwick Harriers)MsenS38:4238:42
51893Mark KearneyMV35S41:0841:08
14543Stephen JacksonMsenF42:5237:52
26508James LeeMV40S43:4043:40
47545Stuart OrdMsenS44:2844:28
53523Michael LittlewoodMV40M44:4042:10
64532Phil RayMV35M45:0142:31
76546Stuart ScottMV35M45:1942:49
87519Matt ClaydonMV40S45:3545:35
104529Paul EvansMV35S45:5845:58
106520Matthew ArcherMV35M46:0043:30
1591912Mike BarlowMV40S47:3547:35
174503Geoff DavisMV60S47:5447:54
184506Jack LeeMsenM48:1345:43
1861890David OxladeMsenS48:1948:19
196517Mark PayneMV35S48:4948:49
2001889Barrie KirtleyMsenS48:5548:55
205507James GarlandMV40M49:1146:41
221487Conrad WhiteMV60S49:5249:52
237498David LumsdonMV50S51:0251:02
242481Andrew DaviesMV40S51:2251:22
249534Richard HockinMV65S52:1252:12
2601892Marc JonesMsenS53:1253:12
2661917Mike BennettMV60S53:2853:28
2761891Jordi Sabate VillaretMV50S54:1654:16
279522Michael HughesMV50S54:3454:34
2961846Nick LathamMV40S55:2555:25
310550Trevor ChaytorMV50S57:3357:33
321547Tim MatthewsMV50S59:4059:40
334544Stephen LumsdenMV45S61:2661:26
339542Stephen EllisMV60S64:1264:12
342479Alan SmithMV70S67:3367:33
women
posbibnamecatpackrace timeactual time
1653Jane Hodgson (Morpeth Harriers & AC)FV35F30:1127:01
51317Fiona BrannanFsenM32:3630:56
36410Elaine BissonFV35F34:4331:33
39436Katy WaltonFV35S34:5134:51
48429Juliet PercivalFV45M35:1933:39
57395Anna BasuFV40M35:3133:51
661352Stef BarlowFV40S35:5935:59
79449Nina MasonFV40S36:3336:33
981336Steph PiperFsenS37:0537:05
104451Rachael BullockFsenM37:1835:38
1051168Natalie BellFsenS37:2337:23
108440Laura JenningsFsenS37:3337:33
114414Fiona ShentonFV55S37:5237:52
118459Sarah FawcettFV55S38:0938:09
1221299Jean BradleyFV60S38:2738:27
137420Jan YoungFV65S39:2739:27
143397Ashley Price-SabateFV50S40:2040:20
181398Barbara DickFV45S44:0044:00
187454Rebecca TalbotFV40S46:0646:06
1901247Alison SmithFV40S47:0947:09