Category Archives: Stuart Scott

Last One Standing, Castleward, Northern Ireland, Saturday, February 15, 2020

4.167 miles.

Stuart Scott

For the second year in a row I went over to Northern Ireland to run last one standing, the race with no end.

The first time I entered this race I was sure I would hate it but I loved it and it got hold of me big time. I was really looking forward to trying to improve on my 29 laps and 120 miles from the previous year and believed from everything I had learnt the first time round this was well within my capabilities.

Unfortunately things did not go to plan and I only managed 14 laps on the horrendous bog fest of a course, I just could not get in the zone and in an event such as last one standing getting in the zone is everything.

Rather Boggy.

The concept is so simple all you have to do is keep moving forward at a pace of 4.167 miles per hour, every hour on the hour until only one competitor remains and this is why I love it so much, its just running and movement in its purest form.

The next few paragraphs are adapted from a post by the inspirational runner, who does an awesome podcast!

You can learn a lot about yourself in these events as they expose every weakness you have physically and mentally, poor preparation and planning will guarantee you any early exit.

You need to learn how to be in tune with your body, problem solving and decision making also needs to be spot on or you will not go the distance, there is very little time to pull back a mistake.

Most people stop well before what they could have achieved as their inner voice is able to justify why it is a good idea not to finish a loop or start another. In a standard 24 hour event you can be in a very dark place but you are able to push on as even if you want to quit you might have to go along way before you can, in the backyard you can end it with great ease whenever you want and this is what makes it so hard.

Eion Keith, one of the best ultra runners on the planet, has stated last one standing races are some of the hardest there are and this is why they appeal to me, I just love the challenge.

Straight off the back of my disappointment at Castleward I was planning my next backyard ultra and as luck would have it Challenge running are putting one on in Suffolk on 6th June and I cant wait.

If you are intrigued please ask me any questions you might have as it would be great to have a good strider turn out at Suffolk and it would be fantastic to see some of you get the buzz I do from these unique events.

Whats the worst that could happen?

How hard can 4.167 miles per hour be ?

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The Spine Challenger, Edale to Hawes, Saturday, January 11, 2020

108 Miles

Stuart Scott

“The Spine Race was definitely something I would never be interested in”

Stuart Scott.

It was approximately 2015 when I first heard about The Montane Spine Race. This beast is a 268 mile race covering the entire Pennine Way, in January. I was intrigued but thought it was just ridiculous, who were these absolute lunatics that even contemplated taking it on? Were they completely insane? Just why would you even want to put yourself through that? The Spine Race was definitely something I would never be interested in, as it seemed a million miles away from anything I would ever be capable of.

Over the two few years I started to compete in bigger and bigger races always wanting to push the boundaries and see just how far I could go.

I was offered a last minute place in The 2018 Spine Challenger, this is the miniature version of The Spine race, known to some race veterans as the baby spine or the fun run. At 108 miles the challenger didn’t seem like much of a fun run to me, I knew I couldn’t take it on last min but it got me thinking as to weather or not I could do it with the right training? The person that offered me the place certainly thought so and the seed was planted.

At the back end of 2018 I finally had the confidence to apply for the 2019 race, the race was sold out by then so I took a waiting list spot. Even at the end of December 2018 I didn’t know for certain if I was running brass monkey or the challenger, I ran brass monkey.

Being self employed I was able to follow The Spine race closely in 2019, I spent nearly the full week cheering various runners on around the course. I got that carried away with everything I even  drove up to Kirk Yetholm to watch Jasmin Paris shatter the course before calling in to cheer another random runner on near Hadrian’s wall, in the dead of the night on my way home, I was truly inspired.

At this point in time I wanted to take on the full spine race, all 268 miles , however my good wife Susan persuaded me it might be a good idea to do the fun run first. I knew doing the challenger first was the most sensible option and with having 3 kids the full spine would also be a massive ask for my wife so the fun run it was.

As the race grew nearer my excitement started to build, I’d missed out on the Lakeland 100, due to a last min injury, and really wanted to smash the challenger to make up for that. I felt great and my coach Margarita Grigoriadi, along with many at Elvet Striders had got me into great condition to do this.

After a request on the Spine facebook page I was kindly offered a lift to the start by Phil Owen, who was on the safety team and Sue Jennings who was also running the challenger. I could not have been happier, I was buzzing and felt so alive, the following day I was not going to be a parent, a taxi driver or a husband, tomorrow I was going to be an ultra runner on one hell of an adventure doing what love.

My race started well, I’m terrible for going off to fast and really wanted to stay with Elaine, she’s a good friend and paces so well, unfortunately for me she was just pushing to hard and I had to let her go, I knew I had to get my pacing right as 108 miles is a long way and I really I didn’t want to mess up this race.

After a few miles I caught Elaine up and we ran together in appalling conditions with rain, fog and really bad visibility, due to concentrating on moving well in the horrendous conditions I neglected to fuel well and this is where my problems started.

New Strider and DFR member Max Wilkinson made a surprise visit to the course and cheered us on not far away from the first checkpoint at Hebdon Bridge, it was great to see someone we knew randomly out there in such tough conditions. When Max left a group of about 4-5 ran together, I knew I needed to take on some food but didn’t want to slow down and risk loosing the pack so I pressed on. As time went by I was getting more and more concerned I needed fuel so I eventually made the decision to eat and lost Elaine and the others.

In big ultra running events if you mess up your nutrition you are done so I knew I had to eat as much as possible at Hebdon Bridge so I tried my best to eat as much as possible and soon felt good again, I was back in the game.

As the miles passed by I was loving every second of it I was doing what I love surrounded by like minded people and knew Elaine was leading the woman’s race everything was great  and I could not be happier.

The miles continued to pass by as the rain, fog and darkness continued. There is not much daylight in January and when you have a long race to do the daylight hours are extremely precious, especially on boggy ground in the fog and rain when you have navigate yourself.

In long ultras the field often becomes very spread out and if you start finding it hard with nobody to be seen as far as the eye can see it really starts to screw with your mind. It was in the early hours of the morning I guess at about 55 miles in on Sunday when my real problems started, I just couldn’t eat. I’ve changed my diet a lot recently and after having had virtually no dairy products for the last couple of months I just couldn’t face my normal race food of Ella’s kitchen and rice pudding.

I was totally by myself and gutted I’d ended up in this situation, I knew any chance I had of racing this event was over and that was a hard pill to swallow as I’d had so much confidence a top ten finish was possible, if everything went well.

I was now in a massive dilemma, I’ve always said I would never quit a race if I’m not injured and have always encouraged other runners to battle on through rough patches, I’ve read many books on ultra running and I know so much of it is about having the correct mindset, staying positive and knowing anything is possible if you just  have the belief it can be done.

The main issues I had were I was currently by myself on a boggy hill in the early hours of the morning on the Pennine way, its early January, I have already covered 55 miles with poor fuelling, I’ve been awake for nearly 24 hours, I’m pissed off I have no chance of a top ten finish and there is 53 miles of the race left. I can DNF very soon and probably be back in Durham fast asleep in a nice warm comfy bed surrounded by my family within a few hours or I can attempt to ‘see out’ another 53 miles of the Pennine way, even writing thus now it seems insane but somehow I was able to convince myself that this was the way forward.

I’d had so many messages of support from friends an family going into this event and as I’d told a few people the time I was hoping for I didn’t want to finish hours and hours behind that without an explanation so I posted on my face book page that unfortunately I was done but I would finish. This meant I now had to.

Within a very short time of posting my message an exceptional ultra runner named John Parkin, I’d met through Bob Graham recce had seen my post, it turns out he lived 5 minutes away from where I was so he got straight into his running gear and came out to say hello and make sure I was OK.  I knew John understood me more than most, as he’s run the UK’s big 3 rounds, and he helped convince me what I was attempting to ‘see out’ was a good idea.

Stuart Battles on.

The next 10 miles took me about 4 and a half hours, I was so frustrated, I kept thinking I’ve run that in just over an hour before this is ridiculous it also dawned on me I would be heading into a second night in yet more fog, wind, bogs, rain and poor visibility. I was also getting a little cold, not really bad or anything but if I’d had extra clothing that wasn’t already soaked through I would definitely have put it on.

I’m not going to lie in saying the next few hours weren’t hell on earth I was just walking along completely and utterly spent, I kept shouting at myself to get a grip, I was seeing things and kept randomly busting into tears I had so long to go but quitting was just not an option for me , I could not believe I actually paid a lot of money to put myself through this living hell.

I would walk for what seemed like at 2-3 miles to see on my gps it was about half a mile I had a long way to go but also knew I could just pull the plug at any time like the 70 plus other runners that did not finish the race.

Every time I came across a supporter, someone from the safety team or mountain rescue I would sort myself out and tell them all was good but mentally I was battered.

The miles slowly very slowly passed by I gained a massive boost when I came across a shop and was able to get some warm food and a coffee. The boost from the warm food and drink got me to a cafe at Malham which left only 34 miles, its funny when you start to think of a marathon a 10k and a bit of a parkrun as the home straight!

Not long after I felt Malham I was intercepted by the Spine media team, I enquired if anyone had won the woman’s race yet and when they said no I continued on my way until  I had a sudden thought. I knew Elaine had the potential to win and last I’d heard she had a good lead so I turned back and asked if I could film a message for the winner as I knew it was definitely going to be Elaine, they laughed and made the clip which later made two episodes of the official spine race summary videos.

As the food from Malham went to work I managed to keep moving forward however I was being extremely lazy using only my gps for navigation and not even bothering to look at my map (I can feel Geoff shacking his head as I write this) in my tired state I started following a blue line instead of the purple one and soon found myself off course. Thankfully this was only minor detour and I did get back on track pretty soon, after having lost a walking pole.

Why couldn’t there just be one big hill instead of ten smaller ones, and fog what’s the point in that?

As the darkness fell for the second night the temperature also started to drop, I must have fallen a dozen times in the next couple of hours, shouting, swearing and cursing at the top of my voice I couldn’t wait for this prolonged torture to come to an end I was definitely  going to take up track running as soon as I was finished this God forsaken race.

I called Susan at this point to tell her it was pretty hard and she didn’t sound to surprised. I asked if Elaine had won, she had but my initial happiness for Elaine soon turned to anger as I realised how far I still had to go an how long this was going to take me. I’d planned to run with Elaine for as long and was hoping to finish within a couple of hours of her but see was already finished and I still had a bloody marathon to go how was this even possible??? Susan assured me I was still doing great but I felt like a total failure.

As I plodded on I noticed another head torch coming towards me this was a welcome site and a decided I was going to give it my all to keep up with them. We were heading for Pen-y-Ghent and the other runner was telling me to prepare for the climb but assured me it was fine once we got off the other side. I gave it my absolute all and managed to tail this other runner all the way to the summit, it was such a great feeling to get this section out the way. My legs had managed the uphill fine but I really struggled on the downhill and was soon on my own again.

I was surrounded by thick fog on Pen-y-Ghent and the decent seemed to be taking forever, I was getting frustrated that there were so many hills, what was the point in them? Why couldn’t there just be one big hill instead of ten smaller ones, and fog what’s the point in that? Its just stupid, such a waste of time and so annoying! I prayed as soon as I got a bit lower the visibility would improve and thankful it did, as the lights of Horton in Ribblesdale came into view I was a very happy man.

There was a checkpoint in Horton and I was greeted outside by a member of the Spine team who offered tea, soup and other warm food it was amazing. I’d been awake for about 35 hours at this point and had covered just over 100 miles, it didn’t take much persuasion to take a power nap. The checkpoint team asked  how long I would like to sleep for so I decided on two hours as this would give enough time for my phone and head torch to fully charge and wouldn’t drag the race on for to much longer before I took on the final push.

The two hours flew over and I was slightly confused as I was woken up by my friend Chris Everett, he had driven all the way down just to offer me a bit of moral support. Chris shoved a tea in my hand and more or less told me to get my arse into gear, stop messing about and get on with it, this is exactly what I needed.

I was dressed and raring to go in no time, it really is amazing what two hours sleep can do for you. I put my favourite fearless motivation album onto repeat and had it blasting out from my fully charged phone as I left Chris and the checkpoint I felt determind and very happy to finally be on the home straight, until another 5 miles down the trail when I started shouting and swearing again.

Where is the stupid bloody left hand turn? Why on Gods earth are they spaced out so much? Whats the point in spacing them out so much surly it would be better for everyone if the turns were closer together? All these questions went round and round in my Head as I got more and more frustrated. I’d had my map in my hand continuously since Hordon but as my watches were both dead I had no idea of distance or time covered and every way-mark I had identified seemed to take so long to get to.

I was moving along constantly staring at the ground, the fog was thick I could have been warmer, I was determind not to miss my turn, you could not believe how long a 2 mile journey can seem when never take your gaze off the ground and with every single step you are hoping  the turn is going to be there, would this torture ever end?

Eventually the turns got ticked off one at a time and the end really was in sight. I called Susan to let her know I was nearly finished and I can remember being so, so happy the pain of everything I had been through immediately started to fade.

Mission accomplished.

I could see a headlight in front of me as I came down off the fell, It turned out to be Chris again as he had decided to hang about at the end to see me finish and transport me home, I was so happy to see him.

I didn’t know how I was going to react at the end and half expected to make a fool of myself by crying again but I didn’t, I was just happy, very content and extremely proud of myself for seeing it through. Despite the convincing myself I’d had the worst race ever I was surprised to learn I’d actually finished as 12th male and 16th overall.

Mentally the Spine challenger is by far the hardest running event I have ever completed, as far as racing is concerned it was probably one of my worst ever performances, however as an overall experience I absolutely loved it and will remember this race till the day I die. I am 100% confident I am going to move on from this experience stronger and even more determind than ever before.

I have learnt so much from this race and despite everything I went through I can not wait until the day I kiss the wall at Kirk Yetholm after having completed the Full Spine race, I know this day will come because I know how much I want it and I’m prepared to put in the work to get there. I’ve always believed you should never except limits or listen to other peoples beliefs of what they think you are capable of, you are the only one that truly knows what you are capable of and if you put in the work and believe something is possible it quite often is.

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Last One Standing, Castleward, Northern Ireland, Saturday, February 16, 2019

Stuart Scott

During the Summer of 2018 I entered GB24, an event where you had to run as many 5.7 mile loops as possible, in 24 hours, I absolutely hated it and vowed never to enter a looped event ever again. Fast forward 7 months and there I am stood on the start line of Last One Standing Castleward a looped event with no pre-determined end.

The format of the race is simple every hour, on the hour, you set off to complete a loop of 4.1666 miles (meaning every 24 hours 100 miles is covered) once you have completed a loop you have to be ready to start the next on the stroke of the following hour. If you fail to complete a loop within one hour you are timed out, if you are not in the start area at the stroke of the next hour you are also timed out. The race continues indefinitely until only one remains, they are crowned the champion and everyone else is officially classed as DNF.

So why would I ever enter such an event when I hated GB24 so much? The reason behind this is I love pushing myself to the limit, big adventures and races that are a little different. One of the most famous extreme ultra marathons in the world called The Barkley Marathons is hosted by a guy called Lazarus Lake, this legend also puts on a race called Big Dogs Back Yard Ultra, Laz stated he would grant automatic entry to his race is you won Last One standing, I just couldn’t resist giving it a shot. Big Dogs Backyard Ultra attracts some of the best ultra runners in the world and I would be joining them out in Tennessee in October if I could pull it off, there were a number of events worldwide that could get you into ‘Bigs’ and the first two golden ticket winners did it in 104 and 129 miles.

At 12 noon on 16th February me, my good wife Susan and 127 others stood on the start line with no idea of how long we were going to be running for. Susan had only decided to enter 4 days previously and the plan was she would stay with me for as long as possible then help support me for as long as it went on for, we were hoping she would complete about 6 laps as she hadn’t run over 10 miles in ages and her distance PB was 26.2 miles.

At the stroke of 12 the race got underway and it just felt really weird as everyone was trying to go as slow as possible, everyone was stressing they were going too fast and people made comments about how stupid some were tearing off at something crazy like a 10 minute mile pace. There was a great atmosphere from the off and everyone was really excited about the prospect of going as far as they possibly could.

As there was 129 of us on relatively small forest trails everyone just snaked along, it felt as if we were part of a big club social run or something. Everyone was just chatting away, enjoying the scenery and getting to know each other it was really very pleasant. The first lap finished and this is when the stress began, we only had 10 minutes to eat, drink, queue then go to the toilet then get ready to start the next lap, it was amazing how fast those few precious minutes went.

The same pattern continued for the next five laps, easy going out on the trail and then a massive stress to get ready for the start of the next lap, completing a 4.1 mile loop in one hour is very doable for most club members however if you need the toilet on your break it can take up a few minutes and you constantly have this little voice telling you if you don’t fuel up properly its game over.

By lap 6 the head torches came out and Susan still felt great, this was a massive bonus for me, we just continued on around as if we were on a Sunday afternoon run out. The laps quickly passed by and as there hadn’t been too many early fallers Susan was determind to keep on going, we hit 10 laps and this is when she decided she had another 2 left in her, if she hit 12 laps that would be 50 miles and a new distance PB for her of 23.8 miles. Susan absolutely smashed it and we were both so happy she’d achieved such a massive distance PB.

Starting lap 13 felt strange, I was now out on my own, there was still a real social feel to the run as everyone is together at the start of each lap and most people are concentrating on going slower rather than faster, you chat a lot along the way. I found myself constantly trying to work out who my real competition were, I would strike up conversation with the people that looked like they were really good runners along with those wearing t shirts for seriously hard races that I intend to complete myself one day.

The laps steadily past by and I continued to feel great, I knew the race would go on a long time so had always just tried to think of the first 24 hours as the warm up, this probably sounds pretty crazy as 24 hours means 100 miles but so much is needed mentally to keep you in a race like this and I had to get my ‘warm up’ right.

By 6 am I was really ready for the night to come to an end as the morning meant I was within reach of my ‘starting point’. At about 6.30am I caught up with another runner who’s head torch had died, as I had a spare I lent him mine, he was very grateful, however unfortunately for me my battery failed 10 minutes after this meaning I was now in the dark without my spare! After 5 minutes of running in the dark, hoping the sun was going to rise any minute, another runner came to my rescue and I borrowed his spare to help complete the lap.

The first 7 minutes of my next break were going great when suddenly I got really bad stomach cramps, in any normal situation I would have headed straight for the toilet however the problem I had was the next loop started in 3 minutes and I simply didn’t have time, I carefully made my way to the start wondering how on earth I was going to get out of this predicament when all of a sudden I felt fine again panic over and off we went.

More time and loops passed by and before I knew it I was coming to the end of loop 24, the 100 mile mark and the long anticipated end of my ‘warm up’. We were told there was going to be a photo to the celebrate the 100 mile club so I spent the last 2 mins of my precious 10 desperately seeking out my striders vest for the photo, I think I made it to the start area with about 15 seconds to spare.

By the end of lap 26 I was on a total runners high, I was buzzing and asking Susan to dig out the head torches again as everything would need to be fully charged as I was definitely going for another night. I don’t think Susan was fully sharing my enthusiasm at this point, she had completed a massive distance PB herself only hours earlier and had, had virtually no sleep as every hour I would come storming into the tent waking her up asking where was this, that and the other, looking back now I don’t know how I didn’t get punched, think I’ve definitely got a good one there!

By the end of lap 27 things were starting to change and I could feel the dreaded death spiral looming. My lap times had all been pretty consistent but when you can hear the call for the next loop to start in 15 minutes and you are still about 10 minutes from the end of a loop it really starts to mess with your head. You are tired, you need a rest, the toilet, to eat, to drink to plan what your next move is but you also know you only have 5 minutes to do this before it all starts again. I finished my lap sat down for a drink trying to think straight then the call came that we had only two minutes to get to the start for the next loop, I could have cried!

My three children had recently arrived with my sister in law and although it was fantastic to see them it didn’t half cause me to have a roller coaster of emotions, when I first saw them I was so happy but then my kids wouldn’t come near me cause I was too smelly!

I started loop 28 trying to put on a brave face for the kids but I was now in serious trouble, I did the first 300 meters or so then my eldest two Oscar 6 and Katie 4 came running across the grass to meet me at the first turn I was way behind the other runners now and am not ashamed to admit I burst into tears when I saw them cheering me on Oscar’s face dropped asking what was the matter I told him I was trying my best and he should always do the same, he told me he would.

I was in a right state, I’d brought my phone on this lap I was listening to my favourite fearless motivation album, I started messaging a people I’ve spent a lot of time training with as well as looking through all the messages of support on the Striders Facebook page desperately seeking for motivation to pull myself out of this hole, I am very grateful to everybody who helped pick me up at this point. I ate a load of sweets, drank a lot of sugary stuff and continued on. My first two miles of this lap must have been really slow but I managed to pull it around somehow and caught a good few of the other runners up, much to their surprise, and finished the lap.

I pretty much knew I wasn’t going to make lap 29, within the hour, however I was never going to give up from the start line so my only option was to set off and hope I didn’t make it back in less than an hour as that would mean I would have to go again, it really screws with your mind!

After the first few hundred meters it was pretty obvious I didn’t have a chance in completing another loop within the hour so I just walked and stumbled round very slowly. I saw Susan her dad and the kids about a mile into this loop and told them it was game over, I think they were all relieved. I stumbled on to the second mile marker and hoped I could just cut back from there taking the final two miles off the course, I was informed this wasn’t allowed so if I did this I would lose the two miles I had done, I wasn’t going to lose these off what was already a massive distance Pb for me so I stumbled on like an 80 year old drunk.

As I stumbled on I came across a border collie that seemed to be with a man on a bike, the dog kept following me and I’ve got to say I quite enjoyed his company, five minutes later the guy on the bike returned to ask if it was my dog as someone had lost one. I told him it wasn’t mine but I took it by the collar and said I would keep walking the race route with it so to let the owner know if he saw her again. I found a piece of rope to make a lead and continued on with my new buddy kind of hoping the owner wouldn’t find me before the end so I could walk in with it for a cool finish photo. The grateful owner caught up with me 200 meters before the end and I was robbed of my ‘Big Dog’ finish

I think I completed lap 29 in about 1h30 and fell into Susan’s arms on the finish line, I was done but am proud to say I gave it everything I had. I waited to shake the hands of the remaining runners and was driven away completely in ore of the 8 remaining runners heading out onto lap 31 with no end in sight and much talk of a 200 mile plus race!

I ended up being 9th last one standing with just over 120 miles whilst the winner Peter Cromie went on to complete 41 laps and over 170 miles!!

Overall both Susan and I absolutely loved this event and we will definitely be heading back next year. It would be fantastic to see some other Striders over there and to have a team tent where we could inspire and motivate each other on to meet our own personal goals so if you fancy a bit of a Striders on tour event please get in touch if any of the following appeal to you:

  • You will most likely set a new distance PB
  • You have the opportunity to push yourself to your absolute limits both mentally and physically
  • You will be surrounded by like minded people in a very social setting
  • You will be massively inspired by being surrounded by so many people achieving huge personal goals
  • Speed means nothing, pacing and endurance is everything
  • You could get a few days in beautiful Northern Ireland out of it
  • If you bring your partner you can enjoy hours of quality time together even if you normally run at completely different paces
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Durham 3 Peaks – Strider Club night, Maiden Castle, Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Stuart Scott

The most fun I’ve ever had over 3 miles!

As soon as I heard about this event I was excited. I’d put so much into the last big challenge. I’d been at a bit of a loose end ever since. This race was my new focus and I wanted to win it.

I’d spent a lot of time over the last year looking at maps and running on hills and wanted to use this to my full advantage. I’d had a look at who was interested in running and knew I wasn’t the fastest but I also knew the massive advantage I could gain by recceing the route well.

I went into full-on stealth mode by switching my Strava account onto private so nobody could see what I was up to; daft I know, as nobody other than me was probably taking it this far, but I was enjoying it. I went out on about 3 recces of the route before I found a line that looked great. It was direct and would save me a big climb, the only problem was, I needed a step ladder.

I was originally planning on using a rope ladder so thought I’d treat my kids to a rope ladder addition to their climbing frame, which I could, then borrow. I could then tie it in place and pull down myself with a bit of string on the night. After testing this method out, it became apparent it wasn’t ideal and I was worried if I committed to this route and couldn’t get up on the rope ladder I’d lose a good few minutes rerouting. I decided I needed a proper ladder and luckily I had an old 12ft set at the side of my garage.

I went down to Whinney Hill roundabout the night before the race and stashed the ladder in a bush before taking a few photos I could then pass on to my partner in crime Elaine Bisson; I also gave her a full brief of what I needed. That was part one of my cunning plan sorted

Part two involved a swim across the river and after a quick up and down the river banks, it became apparent there weren’t many good exit points so I went for a crossing point just by Durham Rowing Club. I didn’t bother having a practice swim and thought I’d leave that one for the night.

Come race night I couldn’t help but chuckle away to myself on the way down to Maiden Castle and I was very relieved to see the ladders were still in place and Elaine was down at the club ready to go, we were both smiling away about it like naughty school kids.

The race set off and I ran as fast as I could across the field and up to the first checkpoint my plan was to get down first, I was sure nobody else would take the route down I had chosen but I didn’t want anyone to follow me and also make use of my secret weapon – the ladders. Elaine had been instructed to move the ladders straight out the way as soon as I was up but if someone was right on my tail that could have been tricky.

I’m pleased to say I made it down first and Elaine had done an excellent job in positioning the ladders, I shot straight-up them then turned to see Elaine running away with them to stash back in the bush. I had a really big smile on my face now and was again chuckling away to myself.

I hit the second checkpoint then headed straight for the Rowing Club. As I ran through the car park, about half a dozen people turned to see where on earth I was heading. I smiled and said don’t worry I’m in a race and then jumped straight into the river. All the rowers on two boats nearby stopped immediately and turned round to see what on earth this madman was doing in the river, I reassured them I wasn’t trying to end my life and made my way to the other side very pleased to see no other runners in sight.

I made a quick ascent to tag the last checkpoint then made my way back down to the river still with no sign of anyone on my tail. As I hit the riverbank I could see Elaine heading towards Maiden Castle, she had been hoping to catch my river crossing but didn’t make it in time. I soon caught Elaine up and was pleased she could confirm nobody else had been passed. It was a short run into Maiden Castle from here and was great to finish the race first, the plan had been a success!

A couple of people were laughing at the end about the fact I was soaked through and had obviously been for a swim. It was great fun to be able to reply ‘the swim was only part of it wait until you hear about the 12ft ladder.’…

This really was one of the most fun and enjoyable races I’ve ever done and the response I’ve had from so many about it has been fantastic, I really can’t wait to see what everyone pulls out the bag next time.

Massive thank you again to everyone involved in organising it and bring on the next one.

Results

PositionNameTime
1Stuart Scott25:12
2Phil Ray26:47
3James Garland27:12
4Conrad White27:34
5Michael Littlewood28:19
6Tim Skelton28:50
7Juan Corbacho29:43
8Ian Butler30:52
9Steve Winship30:52
10Terry Robertson30:52
11Mark Payne32:16
12Jonathan Hamill35:47
13David Browbank35.47
14Robert Allfree35:49
15Dave Toth35:50
16Camilla Maatta36:44
17Steve Ellis36:43
18Chantel Gimby37:30
19Esme Heppell37:50
20Nigel Heppell37:50
21Malcolm Sygrove38:00
22Marita Grimwood39:23
23Damion Cook42:54
24Tim Matthews43:53
25Peter Bell44:14
26Jane Dowsett45:18
27Wendy Littlewood45:18
28Alan Smith45:34
29Carolyn Galulu48:15
30Jill Rudkin48:19
31Nicola Dorricott48:34
32Paul O Hara48:45
33Lynne Waugh48:47
34Becks Lippe48:50
35Roz Layton48:52
36Louise Hughes48:55
37Toni Malkin48:55
38Catherine Smith48.56
39Gareth Pritchard49:00
40James Potter49:02
41Peter Hart49:03
42Sarah Fawcett49.50
43Lesley Hamill50:00
44Karen Byng50:00
45Tom Milburn51.49
46Allison Smith52:43
47Alan Scott52:46
48Matthew David53.41
50Sue Walker54:20
51Phil Todd54:28
52Kath Priest54:28
53Wendy Hughes54:38
54Louise Billcliffe54:42
55Lizzie Wallace54:46
56Danielle Glassey54:46
57Danielle Whitworth54:49
58Keith Wesson54:49
59Jon Turner54:50
60Kirsty Nelson54:55
61Sharon Pattison54:56
62Kerry Barnett58:30
63Alison Clarke58:33
64Carol Holgate58:36
65Sandie Greener58:36
66Helen Linton58:54
67Jean Bradley64:40
68Laura Jennings64:41
69Stef Barlow64:45
70Neil Garthwaite64:57
71Simon Dobson64:57
72Becca Gilmore2 peaks
73Kirsten Fenwick2 peaks
74Alison Heslop2 peaks
75Vics JacksonRetired

First 5 to the top of Houghall Steps (STEPS)

1: Stuart Scott
2: Tim Skelton
3: James Garland
4: Michael Littlewood
5: Mark Payne

First 5 to the top of Whinney Hill (STILE)

1: Chantelle Gimby
2: Nigel Heppell
3: Malcolm Sygrove
4: Esme Heppell
5: James Garland

First 5 to Pelaw Woods Pop Bottle Bridge (BRIDGE)

1: Phil Ray
2: Conrad White
3: Tom Milburn
4: Alison smith
5: Laura Jennings

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Stuart’s Scott’s Biggest Adventure (so far…). The Bob Graham Round, Lake District, Saturday, May 5, 2018

66 miles & 27,000ft of ascent

Stuart Scott

It has taken me a while to put this report together as I’ve really been struggling to write a report that does justice to the enormity of the challenge that is The Bob Graham Round. I really wish I was a better writer to get across fully what this challenge has meant to me, but here’s my best shot at it…

I’ll start with the generic boring bit:

The Bob Graham Round is a fell running challenge that involves completing a route of approximately 66 miles and 27,000ft of ascent over 42 of the highest peaks in The Lake District. The round was first done in 1932 by Bob Graham, a hotel owner in Keswick, who at the age of 42 wanted to complete a circuit of 42 lake-land fells, within 24 hours. The round is known as the testing ground for the supremely fit and being a lover of extreme challenges, from the second I heard about it I knew I had to complete it.

After a little research into what exactly the round involved, I knew I had to become a member of a running club if I wanted to have any chance of completing the round. This is when I decided to join Elvet Striders.

Continue reading Stuart’s Scott’s Biggest Adventure (so far…). The Bob Graham Round
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Montane Cheviot Goat Winter Ultra, Ingram Valley, Cheviot Hills, Saturday, December 2, 2017

55 miles

Stuart Scott

I’ve never written a race report before, however, due to the massive amount of support and well wishes over the last few days I thought that needed to change, so here is my report on The Montane Cheviot Goat.

As soon as I heard about this race I was intrigued, I logged straight onto the website, read all the information and instantly thought, there is no chance I’m not doing that especially in December and that was the end of it.

Fortunately, the organisers kept putting out info on it and then I heard my mate Andy Berry had signed up. He’s the guy who first got me into ultra running. He’s an absolute machine, but every time he’s completed a race, I’ve wanted to do it, convincing myself if he can do it so can I. Andy Berry is also the reason I’m attempting the Bob Graham Round on May 5th. Andy won the Cheviot Goat so I really should have found someone a little easier to compete with!

As I have been building up my fitness for the BGR, I’ve been putting in a lot of training, including heading down in the middle of the night, on a few occasions, to meet random fell runners and BGR enthusiasts I’ve met through online forums etc. I’ve also trained quite a bit with Scott Watson after being massively inspired by his successful BGR attempt earlier in the year. It’s just as well I have been training so hard as I would never have completed that course without it. I’ve completed a 50km ultra and two 69 mile runs previously but they were nothing compared to the mental and physical challenge of the Cheviot Goat. Anyone thinking about it for the future really needs to appreciate this and read other people’s reviews of the course that can be found on The Cheviot Goat Facebook page.

As the event was approaching, the weather forecast just seemed to be getting worse and worse with fog, gale-force winds and temperatures of -5°c with a wind chill of -20°c being reported. To add to my concerns, I’d read on a couple of Internet forums that many thought the event was way harder than people were expecting and a lot of people were going to feel way out of their depth and really struggle. This was not what I needed to hear before my first winter ultra!

The day before the event I was trying to eat as much as possible with plenty of porridge, brown rice, chicken, pasta and sweet potato with a load of water to wash it down.

My plan was to head up to a hotel just near the start at about 6 pm to ensure a good nights sleep but I didn’t end up setting off till after 8 pm and then had to go and register and collect my race number. It wasn’t as busy as I had expected, as many failed to register due to the weather! I ended up getting to the hotel at about 11 pm but the mattress was far too soft and the heating was far too hot, so I only ended up with about 4 hours sleep, again not ideal.

I had to be at the start for 4.30am for kit check and safety brief with the race starting at 5.30am. I felt really fit and strong until I saw the others lined up who made me feel out of shape. We set off bang on time with everyone wrapped up tight with head torches blazing. I felt great at the start but my confidence ebbed a little at the first water station when I didn’t stop and found myself not knowing where to go. The course is totally unmarked and I took the lazy mans option of just following those in front, this strategy worked fine when there were people I could see in front! After rummaging through my various pockets for a minute, I dug out my map and compass and from this point on my map stayed firmly in my hand.

The first few miles were on low lying ground with very little snow, but as soon as we started to climb this changed. Before long we had a good foot of snow to deal with. I was feeling great at this point and knew I was quite near the front of the field, as I could only count about 8-9 sets of footprints in the snow. Brilliant for my navigation, as my new technique was just to follow the footprints. The other benefit of being in the position I was, was the fact the front runners were acting as a snow plough. If I managed to position myself exactly in their footsteps, the going was nowhere near as hard.

The snow had drifted quite a bit in places but I was still able to get a bit of speed up on the downhill sections. Quite often you didn’t know what you were stepping onto but at least when you did fall it was just into soft snow. My waterproof socks were a godsend at this point, as they have a wetsuit type effect. When the water gets in your feet heat up the water so they never really get too cold. I never noticed my feet being cold all day despite the conditions.

After the first section of deep snow it thinned out and the sunrise was absolutely amazing. Myself and the woman I was running with, at this point, talked about how stunningly beautiful it was and what a fantastic feeling it was to be running there. I ended up leaving my running buddy not long after this conversation and shot off down the mountain feeling absolutely king of the world. The feeling I had at this point has only ever been achieved, for me, whilst running in the fells.

A little further along the route, I could see two guys operating a drone on top of the hill I was heading to. I never know what to do when I’m being filmed, so couldn’t decide to look serious, cool and focused or just shout woo-hoo and put my arms out as it hovered above. I think I went for an option somewhere in the middle and am really looking to see that bit of footage when I was on such a natural high.

The next bit was a bit of a blur until we were nearing the halfway point and all I could think about was the rice pudding and can of coke I had in my drop bag. There was quite a climb just before the food station and one guy caught me up and then shot straight off up the hill leaving me standing. Soon after the guy passed me, I turned to see the woman I had been running with at sunrise also catching me up and it’s lucky she did, as I’d dropped my buff while searching for Haribos in my bag and she kindly retrieved it for me. We got talking again. She asked my name then introduced herself as Carol before we started talking about how well our mutual friend Andy Berry was running at the min. We talked about some other races and she mentioned ‘The Spine Challenger’, a 108-mile winter ultra, to which I said there was no chance I would ever enter. I asked her about it and she said she was running ‘The Spine’ race after doing it last year. That thing is 268 miles! I asked if she did well in it, to which she replied she got a good time. I later Googled the race and found out my running buddy was Carol Morgan who smashed the woman’s record in The Spine race last year by 43 hours!!!!

When I got to the halfway point I was greeted with a hot cup of chunky vegetable soup and a bread bun, but all I could think of was my Coke and rice pudding. I ripped open my drop bag and nightmare the coke and rice pudding were missing. I must have put it in the wrong bag! After the soup and a nice bit of cake, I headed out with a Snickers in my hand determined to eat it, as I knew I needed it, especially after having missed out on the rice pudding. I think I carried the Snickers for about 3 miles before I finally got ¾ of it down but it was hard work and I just couldn’t finish it.

The next section was starting to get tough, as tiredness started to kick in and I never saw a single person for miles. At this point, I was so focused on moving forward and watching the ground I got a big surprise when I looked up and saw the most amazing view of the sun setting behind it. The happiness of seeing the beautiful sunset was short lived as I suddenly started to worry about running in the dark once more. I can remember thinking at this point I have about 22 miles left, so that’s only two ten milers and a bit of a parkrun or a great north run and 3 park runs and that’s not too bad.

There was a water station at about 40 miles and it was great to see. Whenever you reached a station or a marshal, they came to great you and gave you a round of applause. It was great seeing them after such a long section without seeing another soul. I can remember joking with them about the takeaway and beer I would be enjoying in a few hours whilst they were still out there.

I really started to slow down after the 40-mile station and the great north run plus one parkrun I had left started to seem like a lot greater a challenge than I had initially hoped. I soon started the climb up to Cheviot and it seemed to go on forever. I think one mile took about 33 min’s and yet again I found myself in deep snow. This was probably my lowest point of the race mentally and physically, as I was just so tired and making very slow progress as darkness fell. I can remember thinking, if it starts snowing or raining heavy, am I even going take make it. It was at this point I considered ringing my wife, but I knew how worried she would get, so I didn’t. If I didn’t have a tracker with an emergency button on it I would have been extremely worried at this point, as I hadn’t seen another runner in hours. They don’t call this race the most lonely for nothing!

I really wouldn’t recommend ever being in that sort of situation without a GPS tracker, a phone and all the proper kit, If a storm had come in at that point and I’d lost my bearings I don’t know if I would have even made it back!

The snow made the very last of the light last longer and I waited until I couldn’t see more than about a meter before digging out my head torch, buff, thicker hat and waterproof trousers. The wind was also getting up at this point but I instantly felt better as I warmed up in my full kit.

As I plodded on up The Cheviot I started to contemplate missing out a section of the course, just to give me that extra chance of making it to the finish. There was a checkpoint about 1km from the summit and the course brought us up around the trig point then down the same route. It just seemed so harsh making us go that bit further to come down the same path. I remember asking the marshal exactly how far it was to the summit, even though I had a map in my hand. I honestly think if he’d said two miles I would have just missed it out. He reassured me it was definitely only about 1km so I continued on.

I can remember thinking at this point I wasn’t even bothered if I missed out part of the course, as all I could hear was the organisers saying you all know your limits so don’t exceed them and I felt right out of my depth at this point. I think the only thing that kept me going was the fact that I didn’t want to hand my race t-shirt back. We had been given them at registration but I’d already decided I’d hand it back if I didn’t complete and I really didn’t want to do that after everything I’d been through. Never before have I been bothered about a race t-shirt but this was no ordinary race.

After reaching the trig point I got a massive boost from somewhere and felt great again. On my way back down to the marshal I passed 4 or 5 runners (the first I’d seen in hours) and made a real point of assuring them how great they were doing and it wasn’t much further to the top. Suddenly the possibility of finishing was back on!

After passing the marshal for the second time there was quite a long downhill section however, the problem was that the snow was that deep you had to, sort-of, skip down the hill and you had no idea what was under the snow. Every now and again you shot down to your waist in the snow, due to a hole you had no idea was there. I spent a good while shaking out my jacket trying to get rid of the snow that had made its way up my back as I’d fallen

As I passed the 45-mile mark, the thought of another 10 in these conditions was an absolute nightmare; three park runs all of a sudden seemed almost impossible! I knew I needed more energy but just couldn’t bring myself to eat any more sweet stuff and the thought of a gel made me feel sick. I will definitely be packing a lot of savoury snacks on my BG attempt. Luckily I still had a load of high-energy mountain fuel in my water bladder so I just drank as much as I could and powered on.

As I neared the bottom of the downhill from Cheviot, I could do nothing but walk and it’s not a good feeling knowing you really should be taking full advantage of the downhill but just couldn’t. I can remember looking back at this point and seeing two head torches slowly catching-up on me. I was so jealous I couldn’t make the most of the downhill like they were. When that first runner passed me, he was the only one to have overtaken me in twenty miles, but it’s a good job he passed me when he did, as not long after he passed, his foot shot down through the snow and became completely stuck under a rock. Luckily for him, I was right behind him and was able to give instant assistance digging him out. We quickly dug away at the snow and he started to shout. His leg was going into cramp. Once all the snow was removed, we started digging out the soil and found that his foot was wedged between two rocks, thankfully one wasn’t too big and we were able to dig it out and free his foot.

The above incident really brought home the extremities of the conditions we were running in. What if the other runner gaining on us had already passed me and my foot had got stuck and nobody was there to help me? I could easily have been stuck there freezing for 30 min’s plus before another runner caught up. If I’d been unable to move, I would have got very cold, very quickly. I did have the GPS tracker with an emergency button, however, due to the remoteness of the location, I couldn’t see the Mountain Rescue being able to get there anytime soon and that is a frightening thought!

After many thanks from the freed runner, it was time to start the next climb, get these final few miles out the way and get the hell out of there. I could see a tread cut out of the snow on the line the runners before me had used, however, I just didn’t have the energy to use it. There was a fence running right the way up to the summit on my right, so I just chose to cling onto that to use it as a handrail most of the way up. The problem with using the fence to pull myself up was nobody else had used that line, so I was cutting through deep snow most of the way up, but I felt it was worth it.

Reaching the top of Hedgehope was an amazing feeling as I was now in the final section of the map. I now knew I would make it and I could keep my t-shirt. I had pretty much given up all hope of running any of the course from here but amazingly my body kept finding that little bit extra and little runs broke out here and there.

With about 3 miles or, as I was thinking, only one park run left, I was walking very slowly and bumped into two guys who worked for an adventure film company. They were making a film about one runner’s story and build up to this race and they offered to walk with me. This was fantastic and I will always be grateful to them. These guys were the first people I had really got to talk in hours. I have no idea what I was babbling on about to them but just having others with me at this point was a massive help.

By this point, a few runners were catching and passing me so I just followed any lights I could see. The downfall of this lazy man’s option became apparent, once again, when it transpired a couple of guys in front had gone the wrong way and I had just blindly followed them. Luckily we didn’t go too far off track and again I was reminded of the importance of good navigation.

With about one and a half miles to go, I started getting excited that the challenge was nearly over. The film guys took a call and I couldn’t be bothered to wait as they stopped to talk, so I just left them, without so much as thanks or goodbye. I feel really bad about this now but was just so focused on finishing at the time.

With about one and a half miles to go my recently changed spare head torch battery died and I was left trying to run in the dark. There were a few runners a little way in front but I soon lost them as I just couldn’t keep-up trying to run without a light but I knew I was on the home straight now.

I came off the fells and onto a road within striking distance of the finish but had no idea of my bearings and couldn’t see my map as it was too dark. My phone was in the bottom of my bag but I couldn’t be bothered to dig it out to get to the light, so I just started running on the road with no idea as to the direction I should be travelling. On reaching a junction I didn’t know where to go. A car passed which I tried to flag down but they mustn’t have had anything to do with the race and drove around me and left me standing waving like crazy.

I was in a massive dilemma now. Do I just continue on in a random direction, as I know the end is a few hundred meters away, or go back to try and find another runner. I wasn’t thinking straight and just wanted to run in any random direction but then started thinking, what if I accidentally take a shortcut and get disqualified. I couldn’t risk having to give my t-shirt back now! Of course, the sensible option was just to stop and get my phone with a built-in torch out, but my brain just wasn’t working properly, so I went for the option of shouting a long list of swear words as I ran back up the road to where I had left the fells. Thank god two runners were just coming onto the road as I got back. I ranted at them for a minute about what had happened to me whilst following them back up the road I now knew well and over the finish line!

A small group came out to applaud us as we finished and there were many congratulations from fellow runners and race organisers. I collapsed into a chair and swore blind to buy a drink for any person I ever see in any bar wearing a Montane Cheviot Goat T-Shirt!

The pain in my feet was unreal as I pulled my trainers off and I could hardly walk over to my bags to retrieve my clean warm dry clothes. I pulled my fresh clothes on and called my wife, so happy to proclaim, I had finished and was still in one piece. As I sat there waiting for some feeling to return to my feet, I started sorting through my bags and instantly found my rice pudding and Coke in the top compartment of my drop-bag. It had been there all along…..gutted!

This race is by far the hardest ultra I have ever run, it pushed me to the max both physically and mentally and although I swore never again at the end, I cannot wait to beat my time next year!

Thank you to everyone in the Striders who has helped me improve my running, as I would never have completed this run without your help!

Anyone interested in seeing the relive video of my run can find it here:

Relive ‘The Cheviot Goat’

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