The Wee Toughie, Eyemouth, Coldingham Sands, Sunday, October 12, 2014

Colin Blackburn

Before the start.Today I was meant to be running the Aviemore Half. Unfortunately work had other ideas and I had to be in Liverpool by 10am on the Monday, not something I could really do even with a blistering PB. I resigned myself to staying at home and I looked around for an alternative. By the power of social media I came across the Eyemouth 10K, a multi-terrain race that styled itself as The Wee Toughie. It also turned out it was its first running. Eyemouth is about 12 miles from our house so very much on the doorstep with the advantage of being somewhere Elfie and I had yet to explore. The race was organised by Run Eyemouth and the Borders Sport and Leisure Trust. As I’m in an English club I got to pay the extra £2 for not being Scottish but £12 is still not too bad these days.

It turned out that the race started a little way up the coast on a beach – ring any bells? – in the absolutely beautiful little bay just down from Coldingham. And just to add stunning to beauty it was a glorious day. Crisp autumn sunshine making for the perfect conditions, I ditched the second layer. There was a pre-race briefing, outside the Beach Cafe which housed registration, where I got the gist of the route but as I wouldn’t be leading and the course was marshalled and marked I thought I’d be okay. As the start time approached the 40-50 runners gathered behind a line in the sand. I moved down to the firmest sand, Coastal Run experience kicking in.

The beach section was a little shorter than at Beadnell! Just a few hundred yards and then we were up some killer steep steps to the cliff-top path. This is a really painful start to a race. The footpath then follows the headland, opening up to some stunning views, round to St Abbs. (St Abbs is a pretty little fishing village but appears to be a made-up Victorian name as there is no St Abb.) Through the village and after a short section of road and some roadside paths it is through a farm and down onto narrow woodland footpaths. Before long we’re out onto the grassland around the top of Mire Loch and I assumed back down towards St Abbs.

That would be too easy! A sharp left takes us up a line of telegraph poles on what can only be described to the sassenachs as a fell section. Tussocky-grassy steep, then bare-hillsided steeper. Over the summit the sea views open up again, this coastline is nothing short of spectacular – at times like this I wish I carried a camera. Then it’s down some rocky steps before a long tarmacked and tracked section taking us back towards St Abbs from where the race retraces its path along the cliff, down the steps and across the beach to the finish.

Did it live up to its name? Certainly, it was a wee toughie and I was very pleased with 50:50 – though it my have been a wee shortie too. But beyond that it was a very friendly, well-marshalled, well-organised race with stunning views and a bit of terrain to suit everyone. Of course next October it’ll be driech but if this race is back then I hope to be too! It’s a long way from Durham but I can’t recommend this one highly enough.

Before the finish.

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